Workplace incivility and knowledge hiding behavior

does personality matter?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between workplace incivility and knowledge hiding, and role of personality disposition (neuroticism) in moderating such relationships. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 108 employees nested in 18 teams from private sectors via survey questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis and hierarchical regression models were used to test the hypotheses. Findings: The findings show that the higher the level of workplace incivility experienced by the team members, the higher the tendency for them to hide knowledge and this relationship is moderated by neuroticism. Specifically, the relationship was found to be stronger for those employees high in neuroticism compared to those low in neuroticism. Practical implications: The study offers important implication in term of knowledge hiding prevention or reduction. The behavior can be reduced by creating awareness among employees on the importance of civility at work via campaign, realistic job preview and leading by example. To manage the effect of neuroticism, managers need to identify those high in the trait and provide them with training on how to better regulate and manage negative emotions in the workplace. Originality/value: The study contributes to the research on knowledge hiding behavior by advancing the understanding of organizational and personal factors that can influence knowledge hiding among employees working in team. It is the first to propose and empirically validate the predictive effect of workplace incivility on knowledge hiding. It also addresses the usefulness of examining personality disposition in understanding the relationship between workplace incivility and knowledge hiding behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)278-288
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Organizational Effectiveness
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Sep 2018

Fingerprint

Work place
Neuroticism
Incivility
Employees
Disposition
Factors
Hierarchical regression
Questionnaire survey
Negative emotions
Confirmatory factor analysis
Managers
Usefulness
Private sector
Realistic job preview
Design methodology
Regression model

Keywords

  • Knowledge hiding
  • Neuroticism
  • Personality
  • Work team
  • Workplace incivility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

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title = "Workplace incivility and knowledge hiding behavior: does personality matter?",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between workplace incivility and knowledge hiding, and role of personality disposition (neuroticism) in moderating such relationships. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 108 employees nested in 18 teams from private sectors via survey questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis and hierarchical regression models were used to test the hypotheses. Findings: The findings show that the higher the level of workplace incivility experienced by the team members, the higher the tendency for them to hide knowledge and this relationship is moderated by neuroticism. Specifically, the relationship was found to be stronger for those employees high in neuroticism compared to those low in neuroticism. Practical implications: The study offers important implication in term of knowledge hiding prevention or reduction. The behavior can be reduced by creating awareness among employees on the importance of civility at work via campaign, realistic job preview and leading by example. To manage the effect of neuroticism, managers need to identify those high in the trait and provide them with training on how to better regulate and manage negative emotions in the workplace. Originality/value: The study contributes to the research on knowledge hiding behavior by advancing the understanding of organizational and personal factors that can influence knowledge hiding among employees working in team. It is the first to propose and empirically validate the predictive effect of workplace incivility on knowledge hiding. It also addresses the usefulness of examining personality disposition in understanding the relationship between workplace incivility and knowledge hiding behavior.",
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