Women’s Attitude and Its Influence on Violence During Pregnancy in Northern State of Peninsular Malaysia

Cross-Sectional Study

Khaironisak Haron, Zaridah Shaffie, Hasanain Faisal Ghazi, Zaleha Md Isa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of men’s violence against pregnant women and whether it is influenced by women’s attitude. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a hospital in northern state of Peninsular Malaysia. A total of 1,200 postnatal women aged 18 years and above who had been admitted to the hospital were recruited in the study. Universal sampling was performed, and participants were interviewed face-to-face by using a validated Malay version of WHO Women’s Health and Life Experiences Questionnaire. The main outcome measures in the study were emotional, physical or sexual violence. The study results showed that more than one third of women (35.9%; confidence interval [CI] = [0.33, 0.39]) had experienced any type of violence during pregnancy with the commonest was psychological violence (29.8%; CI = [0.27, 0.32]) followed by physical (12.9%; CI = [0.11, 0.15]) and sexual violence (9.8%; CI = [0.08, 0.12]). Women who were drug users, had an exposure to violence during childhood, had higher parity, and had inadequate antenatal care were at greater risk. Agree that husband is justified to hit his wife in certain conditions and agree that women has a right to refuse sex in certain conditions were among violence-supporting attitudes. It can be concluded that men’s violence against pregnant women is extremely prevalent. Sensitive assessment, attitude modification, and intervention (primary, secondary, and tertiary) are of great value in combating men’s violence against pregnant women.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Apr 2018

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Violence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Pregnancy
Confidence Intervals
Pregnant Women
Sex Offenses
Spouses
Prenatal Care
Life Change Events
Women's Health
Drug Users
Parity
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Psychology

Keywords

  • pregnancy
  • violence
  • violence attitude
  • violence prevalence
  • violence risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Women’s Attitude and Its Influence on Violence During Pregnancy in Northern State of Peninsular Malaysia : Cross-Sectional Study. / Haron, Khaironisak; Shaffie, Zaridah; Ghazi, Hasanain Faisal; Md Isa, Zaleha.

In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 01.04.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of men’s violence against pregnant women and whether it is influenced by women’s attitude. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a hospital in northern state of Peninsular Malaysia. A total of 1,200 postnatal women aged 18 years and above who had been admitted to the hospital were recruited in the study. Universal sampling was performed, and participants were interviewed face-to-face by using a validated Malay version of WHO Women’s Health and Life Experiences Questionnaire. The main outcome measures in the study were emotional, physical or sexual violence. The study results showed that more than one third of women (35.9{\%}; confidence interval [CI] = [0.33, 0.39]) had experienced any type of violence during pregnancy with the commonest was psychological violence (29.8{\%}; CI = [0.27, 0.32]) followed by physical (12.9{\%}; CI = [0.11, 0.15]) and sexual violence (9.8{\%}; CI = [0.08, 0.12]). Women who were drug users, had an exposure to violence during childhood, had higher parity, and had inadequate antenatal care were at greater risk. Agree that husband is justified to hit his wife in certain conditions and agree that women has a right to refuse sex in certain conditions were among violence-supporting attitudes. It can be concluded that men’s violence against pregnant women is extremely prevalent. Sensitive assessment, attitude modification, and intervention (primary, secondary, and tertiary) are of great value in combating men’s violence against pregnant women.",
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