Why do young adolescents bully? Experience in Malaysian schools

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Abstract

Introduction To determine sociodemographic and psychological factors associated with bullying behavior among young adolescents in Malaysia. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of four hundred ten 12-year-old adolescents from seven randomly sampled schools in the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Sociodemographic features of the adolescents and their parents, bullying behavior (Malaysian Bullying Questionnaire), ADHD symptoms (Conners Rating Scales), and internalizing and externalizing behavior (Child Behaviour Checklist) were obtained from adolescents, parents and teachers, respectively. Results Only male gender (OR = 7.071, p = 0.01*, CI = 1.642-30.446) was a significant sociodemographic factor among bullies. Predominantly hyperactive (OR = 2.285, p = 0.00*, CI = 1.507-3.467) and inattentive ADHD symptoms reported by teachers (OR = 1.829, p = 0.03*, CI = 1.060-3.154) and parents (OR = 1.709, p = 0.03*, CI = 1.046-2.793) were significant risk factors for bullying behavior while combined symptoms reported by young adolescents (OR = 0.729, p = 0.01*, CI = 0.580-0.915) and teachers (OR = 0.643, p = 0.02*, CI = 0.440-0.938) were protective against bullying behavior despite the influence of conduct behavior (OR = 3.160, p = 0.00*, CI = 1.600-6.241). Internalizing behavior, that is, withdrawn (OR = 0.653, p = 0.04*, CI = 0.436-0.977) and somatic complaints (OR = 0.619, p = 0.01*, CI = 0.430-0.889) significantly protect against bullying behavior. Discussions Recognizing factors associated with bullying behavior, in particular factors distinctive to the local population, facilitates in strategizing effective interventions for school bullying among young adolescents in Malaysian schools.

Original languageEnglish
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume55
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

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Bullying
Child Behavior
Checklist
Parents
Malaysia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Why do young adolescents bully? Experience in Malaysian schools",
abstract = "Introduction To determine sociodemographic and psychological factors associated with bullying behavior among young adolescents in Malaysia. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of four hundred ten 12-year-old adolescents from seven randomly sampled schools in the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Sociodemographic features of the adolescents and their parents, bullying behavior (Malaysian Bullying Questionnaire), ADHD symptoms (Conners Rating Scales), and internalizing and externalizing behavior (Child Behaviour Checklist) were obtained from adolescents, parents and teachers, respectively. Results Only male gender (OR = 7.071, p = 0.01*, CI = 1.642-30.446) was a significant sociodemographic factor among bullies. Predominantly hyperactive (OR = 2.285, p = 0.00*, CI = 1.507-3.467) and inattentive ADHD symptoms reported by teachers (OR = 1.829, p = 0.03*, CI = 1.060-3.154) and parents (OR = 1.709, p = 0.03*, CI = 1.046-2.793) were significant risk factors for bullying behavior while combined symptoms reported by young adolescents (OR = 0.729, p = 0.01*, CI = 0.580-0.915) and teachers (OR = 0.643, p = 0.02*, CI = 0.440-0.938) were protective against bullying behavior despite the influence of conduct behavior (OR = 3.160, p = 0.00*, CI = 1.600-6.241). Internalizing behavior, that is, withdrawn (OR = 0.653, p = 0.04*, CI = 0.436-0.977) and somatic complaints (OR = 0.619, p = 0.01*, CI = 0.430-0.889) significantly protect against bullying behavior. Discussions Recognizing factors associated with bullying behavior, in particular factors distinctive to the local population, facilitates in strategizing effective interventions for school bullying among young adolescents in Malaysian schools.",
author = "{Wan Ismail}, {Wan Salwina} and {Nik Jaafar}, {Nik Ruzyanei} and Hatta Sidi and Marhani Midin and Shah, {Shamsul Azhar}",
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T1 - Why do young adolescents bully? Experience in Malaysian schools

AU - Wan Ismail, Wan Salwina

AU - Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei

AU - Sidi, Hatta

AU - Midin, Marhani

AU - Shah, Shamsul Azhar

PY - 2014/1

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N2 - Introduction To determine sociodemographic and psychological factors associated with bullying behavior among young adolescents in Malaysia. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of four hundred ten 12-year-old adolescents from seven randomly sampled schools in the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Sociodemographic features of the adolescents and their parents, bullying behavior (Malaysian Bullying Questionnaire), ADHD symptoms (Conners Rating Scales), and internalizing and externalizing behavior (Child Behaviour Checklist) were obtained from adolescents, parents and teachers, respectively. Results Only male gender (OR = 7.071, p = 0.01*, CI = 1.642-30.446) was a significant sociodemographic factor among bullies. Predominantly hyperactive (OR = 2.285, p = 0.00*, CI = 1.507-3.467) and inattentive ADHD symptoms reported by teachers (OR = 1.829, p = 0.03*, CI = 1.060-3.154) and parents (OR = 1.709, p = 0.03*, CI = 1.046-2.793) were significant risk factors for bullying behavior while combined symptoms reported by young adolescents (OR = 0.729, p = 0.01*, CI = 0.580-0.915) and teachers (OR = 0.643, p = 0.02*, CI = 0.440-0.938) were protective against bullying behavior despite the influence of conduct behavior (OR = 3.160, p = 0.00*, CI = 1.600-6.241). Internalizing behavior, that is, withdrawn (OR = 0.653, p = 0.04*, CI = 0.436-0.977) and somatic complaints (OR = 0.619, p = 0.01*, CI = 0.430-0.889) significantly protect against bullying behavior. Discussions Recognizing factors associated with bullying behavior, in particular factors distinctive to the local population, facilitates in strategizing effective interventions for school bullying among young adolescents in Malaysian schools.

AB - Introduction To determine sociodemographic and psychological factors associated with bullying behavior among young adolescents in Malaysia. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of four hundred ten 12-year-old adolescents from seven randomly sampled schools in the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Sociodemographic features of the adolescents and their parents, bullying behavior (Malaysian Bullying Questionnaire), ADHD symptoms (Conners Rating Scales), and internalizing and externalizing behavior (Child Behaviour Checklist) were obtained from adolescents, parents and teachers, respectively. Results Only male gender (OR = 7.071, p = 0.01*, CI = 1.642-30.446) was a significant sociodemographic factor among bullies. Predominantly hyperactive (OR = 2.285, p = 0.00*, CI = 1.507-3.467) and inattentive ADHD symptoms reported by teachers (OR = 1.829, p = 0.03*, CI = 1.060-3.154) and parents (OR = 1.709, p = 0.03*, CI = 1.046-2.793) were significant risk factors for bullying behavior while combined symptoms reported by young adolescents (OR = 0.729, p = 0.01*, CI = 0.580-0.915) and teachers (OR = 0.643, p = 0.02*, CI = 0.440-0.938) were protective against bullying behavior despite the influence of conduct behavior (OR = 3.160, p = 0.00*, CI = 1.600-6.241). Internalizing behavior, that is, withdrawn (OR = 0.653, p = 0.04*, CI = 0.436-0.977) and somatic complaints (OR = 0.619, p = 0.01*, CI = 0.430-0.889) significantly protect against bullying behavior. Discussions Recognizing factors associated with bullying behavior, in particular factors distinctive to the local population, facilitates in strategizing effective interventions for school bullying among young adolescents in Malaysian schools.

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