Chinese source

Translated title of the contribution: What's on malaysian television? - A survey on food advertising targeting children

Tilakavati Karupaiah, Karuthan Chinna, Loi Huei Mee, Lim Siau Mei, Mohd Ismail Noor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Malaysian government recently introduced a ban on fast food advertisements targeting children on television. This study reports on data covering 6 months of television food advertising targeting children. Six out of seven of the Nation's commercial television networks participated (response rate = 85.7%). Based on reported timings of children's programmes, prime time significantly differed (p<0.05) between weekdays (mean = 1.89 ± 0.18 hr) and weekends (mean = 4.61 ± 0.33 hr). The increased trend during weekends, school vacation and Ramadhan was evident. Over the six-month period, the mean number of food advertisements appearing per month varied greatly between television stations (C = 1104; D = 643; F = 407; B = 327; A = 59; E = 47). Food advertising also increased the most in September (n = 3158), followed by July (n = 2770), August (n = 2431), October (n = 2291), November (n = 2245) and June (n = 2211). Content analysis of advertisements indicated snacks were the highest (34.5%), followed by dairy products (20.3%), sugars and candies (13.4%), biscuits (11.2%), fast food (6.7%), breakfast cereal (6.4%), beverages (4.1%), supplements (0.9%), rice (0.6%), noodles (0.5%), bread (0.3%), miscellaneous and processed foods (0.2%). Paradoxically, we found that the frequency of snack food advertised during children's prime time was 5 times more than fast foods. The sodium content (mean = 620 mg per 100g) of these snack foods was found to be highest.

Original languageChinese
Pages (from-to)483-491
Number of pages9
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume17
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

Television
Fast Foods
Snacks
Food
Candy
Breakfast
Dairy Products
Bread
Beverages
Sodium
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Advertising
  • Children
  • Content analysis
  • Food groups
  • Television

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Karupaiah, T., Chinna, K., Mee, L. H., Mei, L. S., & Noor, M. I. (2008). Chinese source. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 17(3), 483-491.

Chinese source. / Karupaiah, Tilakavati; Chinna, Karuthan; Mee, Loi Huei; Mei, Lim Siau; Noor, Mohd Ismail.

In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 17, No. 3, 09.2008, p. 483-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Karupaiah, T, Chinna, K, Mee, LH, Mei, LS & Noor, MI 2008, 'Chinese source', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 483-491.
Karupaiah T, Chinna K, Mee LH, Mei LS, Noor MI. Chinese source. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008 Sep;17(3):483-491.
Karupaiah, Tilakavati ; Chinna, Karuthan ; Mee, Loi Huei ; Mei, Lim Siau ; Noor, Mohd Ismail. / Chinese source. In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 483-491.
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