What determines teenagers' smoking behaviour? A qualitative study

Hizlinda Tohid, Noriah Mohd. Ishak, Noor Azimah Muhammad, Hasliza Abu Hassan, Farah Naaz Momtaz Ahmad, Khairani Omar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The study aimed to explore smoking behaviour among Malaysian teenagers that were related to their smoking initiation, cigarette consumption, quit intention, and quit attempts. Methods: It was a qualitative study that used multiple case study design, involving 26 teenagers (23 smokers and three former smokers) from three public schools. Data was collected via questionnaires, three focus group interviews and three in-depth interviews over 20 months. A standardised semi-structured interview protocol was utilised. Results: Among the participants, 74% of them started smoking after the age of 12 years old. The majority (20/23) of the teenage smokers admitted to smoking every day and 74% of them smoked not more than 5 cigarettes a day. All of the smokers had the intention to quit but only 22 out of the 23 teenage smokers had attempted quitting. Sixty percent of these teenagers had more than three quit attempts. In general, this study captured the complexity of the teenagers' smoking behaviour that could be influenced by multiple factors, including behavioural (e.g. nicotine addiction), personal (e.g. conception of smoking and quitting, curiosity, sensation seeking, knowledge about smoking cessation, stress, maintaining athletic performance, and finance.) and environmental (e.g. socialisation, peer pressure, parental smoking, parental disapproval, and boy- or girlfriend aversion) factors. Conclusions: This study described the complex and multidimensional nature of teenage smoking behaviour. The findings also correspondingly matched the Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), therefore suggesting the theory's suitability in elucidating smoking behaviour among the Malaysian teenagers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-198
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Medical Journal
Volume18
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011

Fingerprint

Smoking
Interviews
Athletic Performance
Exploratory Behavior
Socialization
Smoking Cessation
Focus Groups
Nicotine
Tobacco Products

Keywords

  • Cigarette consumption
  • Quit smoking
  • Smoking
  • Smoking initiation
  • Teenagers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

What determines teenagers' smoking behaviour? A qualitative study. / Tohid, Hizlinda; Mohd. Ishak, Noriah; Muhammad, Noor Azimah; Hassan, Hasliza Abu; Ahmad, Farah Naaz Momtaz; Omar, Khairani.

In: International Medical Journal, Vol. 18, No. 3, 09.2011, p. 194-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tohid, Hizlinda ; Mohd. Ishak, Noriah ; Muhammad, Noor Azimah ; Hassan, Hasliza Abu ; Ahmad, Farah Naaz Momtaz ; Omar, Khairani. / What determines teenagers' smoking behaviour? A qualitative study. In: International Medical Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 194-198.
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