Weed problems and their management in rice fields of Malaysia: An overview

Rezaul S M Karim, Azmi B. Man, Ismail Sahid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The available literature on weed problems and weed control in rice fields in Malaysia is reviewed and suggestions for future research are included. The problem of weed competition with rice is of great economic importance in the country because it causes a 10-35% reduction in grain yield. About US$4.10 million is spent annually on herbicides for rice alone, and this amounts to approximately 7% of the total expenditure on herbicides. The shift in methods of rice culture from transplanting to direct seeding has magnified the weed problem. The problem of weedy rice is particularly acute in the direct-seeding rice areas. Although a number of sulfonylurea herbicides (e.g. cinosulfuron, metsulfuron, bensulfuron and pyrazosulfuron) have been found to be suitable alternatives to the old herbicide 2,4-D, an integrated weed management program must be developed in order to reduce the problem of herbicide resistance in weeds. Weed control methods that are more friendly to the environment and affordable to farmers must be sought. Weed-competitive and allelopathic rice varieties must be produced. The problem of weeds in rice calls for systematic studies on biotechnological methods of control of weedy rice. Detailed studies on the biology and ecology of notorious rice weeds, particularly Oryza sativa L. (weedy rice), Echinochloa spp., Leptochloa chinensis (L.) Nees, Fimbristylis miliacea (L.) Vahl. and Limnocharis flava (L.) Buch. need to be done in order to formulate successful weed control measures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-186
Number of pages10
JournalWeed Biology and Management
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

paddy field
Malaysia
paddies
weed
rice
weeds
herbicide
weed control
control methods
herbicides
direct seeding
seeding
Leptochloa chinensis
bensulfuron
Fimbristylis
metsulfuron
sulfonylurea herbicides
Echinochloa
integrated weed management
crop-weed competition

Keywords

  • Direct-seeding rice
  • Rice weeds
  • Weed management
  • Weed resistance
  • Weed shifting
  • Weedy rice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Plant Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Weed problems and their management in rice fields of Malaysia : An overview. / Karim, Rezaul S M; Man, Azmi B.; Sahid, Ismail.

In: Weed Biology and Management, Vol. 4, No. 4, 2004, p. 177-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f13ad43e834a425f8306d13793164875,
title = "Weed problems and their management in rice fields of Malaysia: An overview",
abstract = "The available literature on weed problems and weed control in rice fields in Malaysia is reviewed and suggestions for future research are included. The problem of weed competition with rice is of great economic importance in the country because it causes a 10-35{\%} reduction in grain yield. About US$4.10 million is spent annually on herbicides for rice alone, and this amounts to approximately 7{\%} of the total expenditure on herbicides. The shift in methods of rice culture from transplanting to direct seeding has magnified the weed problem. The problem of weedy rice is particularly acute in the direct-seeding rice areas. Although a number of sulfonylurea herbicides (e.g. cinosulfuron, metsulfuron, bensulfuron and pyrazosulfuron) have been found to be suitable alternatives to the old herbicide 2,4-D, an integrated weed management program must be developed in order to reduce the problem of herbicide resistance in weeds. Weed control methods that are more friendly to the environment and affordable to farmers must be sought. Weed-competitive and allelopathic rice varieties must be produced. The problem of weeds in rice calls for systematic studies on biotechnological methods of control of weedy rice. Detailed studies on the biology and ecology of notorious rice weeds, particularly Oryza sativa L. (weedy rice), Echinochloa spp., Leptochloa chinensis (L.) Nees, Fimbristylis miliacea (L.) Vahl. and Limnocharis flava (L.) Buch. need to be done in order to formulate successful weed control measures.",
keywords = "Direct-seeding rice, Rice weeds, Weed management, Weed resistance, Weed shifting, Weedy rice",
author = "Karim, {Rezaul S M} and Man, {Azmi B.} and Ismail Sahid",
year = "2004",
doi = "10.1111/j.1445-6664.2004.00136.x",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "177--186",
journal = "Weed Biology and Management",
issn = "1444-6162",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Weed problems and their management in rice fields of Malaysia

T2 - An overview

AU - Karim, Rezaul S M

AU - Man, Azmi B.

AU - Sahid, Ismail

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - The available literature on weed problems and weed control in rice fields in Malaysia is reviewed and suggestions for future research are included. The problem of weed competition with rice is of great economic importance in the country because it causes a 10-35% reduction in grain yield. About US$4.10 million is spent annually on herbicides for rice alone, and this amounts to approximately 7% of the total expenditure on herbicides. The shift in methods of rice culture from transplanting to direct seeding has magnified the weed problem. The problem of weedy rice is particularly acute in the direct-seeding rice areas. Although a number of sulfonylurea herbicides (e.g. cinosulfuron, metsulfuron, bensulfuron and pyrazosulfuron) have been found to be suitable alternatives to the old herbicide 2,4-D, an integrated weed management program must be developed in order to reduce the problem of herbicide resistance in weeds. Weed control methods that are more friendly to the environment and affordable to farmers must be sought. Weed-competitive and allelopathic rice varieties must be produced. The problem of weeds in rice calls for systematic studies on biotechnological methods of control of weedy rice. Detailed studies on the biology and ecology of notorious rice weeds, particularly Oryza sativa L. (weedy rice), Echinochloa spp., Leptochloa chinensis (L.) Nees, Fimbristylis miliacea (L.) Vahl. and Limnocharis flava (L.) Buch. need to be done in order to formulate successful weed control measures.

AB - The available literature on weed problems and weed control in rice fields in Malaysia is reviewed and suggestions for future research are included. The problem of weed competition with rice is of great economic importance in the country because it causes a 10-35% reduction in grain yield. About US$4.10 million is spent annually on herbicides for rice alone, and this amounts to approximately 7% of the total expenditure on herbicides. The shift in methods of rice culture from transplanting to direct seeding has magnified the weed problem. The problem of weedy rice is particularly acute in the direct-seeding rice areas. Although a number of sulfonylurea herbicides (e.g. cinosulfuron, metsulfuron, bensulfuron and pyrazosulfuron) have been found to be suitable alternatives to the old herbicide 2,4-D, an integrated weed management program must be developed in order to reduce the problem of herbicide resistance in weeds. Weed control methods that are more friendly to the environment and affordable to farmers must be sought. Weed-competitive and allelopathic rice varieties must be produced. The problem of weeds in rice calls for systematic studies on biotechnological methods of control of weedy rice. Detailed studies on the biology and ecology of notorious rice weeds, particularly Oryza sativa L. (weedy rice), Echinochloa spp., Leptochloa chinensis (L.) Nees, Fimbristylis miliacea (L.) Vahl. and Limnocharis flava (L.) Buch. need to be done in order to formulate successful weed control measures.

KW - Direct-seeding rice

KW - Rice weeds

KW - Weed management

KW - Weed resistance

KW - Weed shifting

KW - Weedy rice

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=11144350987&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=11144350987&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1445-6664.2004.00136.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1445-6664.2004.00136.x

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:11144350987

VL - 4

SP - 177

EP - 186

JO - Weed Biology and Management

JF - Weed Biology and Management

SN - 1444-6162

IS - 4

ER -