Wall pressure due to turbulent flow through orifice plate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Flow velocity and pressure are two related phenomena in the flowing fluid in a pipe containing an orifice. In this study, the focus will be on the pressure which is known to researchers under variety of names such as pressure distribution, pressure fluctuation, static pressure, pressure loss, or line pressure. This pressure (not the dynamic pressure) is triggered by the disturbance of the flow passed the orifice as the flow contract spinning, rotation, and circulation through which the flow transiently causes pressure on the wall which increasingly becomes a real concern to the designers of piping circuit of nuclear plant, turbines, or, more importantly, the flow measurement. Navier-Stocks equations have been employed to describe the velocity, pressure, stress, vorticity, strain, and total deformation using commercial CFD code ANSYS for incompressible fluid. The pressure fluctuation in conjunction with flow velocity was studied at three aspect ratios of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 at Reynolds number of 10000, 20000, and 30000. The study shows a strong correlation between the flow velocity (directly related to Reynolds number) and both the pressure and the stress acting on the wall. The axial maximum magnitude of the velocity and pressure appear around the orifice plate and both diminish beyond that. Vorticity and flow velocity are well correlated and are in good agreement with previous studies. The maximum stress, strain, and total deformation have powerful effect on wall at aspect ratio of 0.2 while this effect is almost nullified when the aspect ratio is higher. The study adds to the body of knowledge better understanding to the effect of higher Reynolds numbers and higher aspect ratios.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-41
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering
Volume15
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Orifices
Turbulent flow
Flow velocity
Aspect ratio
Reynolds number
Vorticity
Fluids
Flow measurement
Pressure distribution
Computational fluid dynamics
Turbines
Pipe

Keywords

  • CFD-ANSYS
  • Mechanical properties
  • Navier-stokes equation
  • Term--orifice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

@article{f63ff435d69c4824b07e22725fc85efd,
title = "Wall pressure due to turbulent flow through orifice plate",
abstract = "Flow velocity and pressure are two related phenomena in the flowing fluid in a pipe containing an orifice. In this study, the focus will be on the pressure which is known to researchers under variety of names such as pressure distribution, pressure fluctuation, static pressure, pressure loss, or line pressure. This pressure (not the dynamic pressure) is triggered by the disturbance of the flow passed the orifice as the flow contract spinning, rotation, and circulation through which the flow transiently causes pressure on the wall which increasingly becomes a real concern to the designers of piping circuit of nuclear plant, turbines, or, more importantly, the flow measurement. Navier-Stocks equations have been employed to describe the velocity, pressure, stress, vorticity, strain, and total deformation using commercial CFD code ANSYS for incompressible fluid. The pressure fluctuation in conjunction with flow velocity was studied at three aspect ratios of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 at Reynolds number of 10000, 20000, and 30000. The study shows a strong correlation between the flow velocity (directly related to Reynolds number) and both the pressure and the stress acting on the wall. The axial maximum magnitude of the velocity and pressure appear around the orifice plate and both diminish beyond that. Vorticity and flow velocity are well correlated and are in good agreement with previous studies. The maximum stress, strain, and total deformation have powerful effect on wall at aspect ratio of 0.2 while this effect is almost nullified when the aspect ratio is higher. The study adds to the body of knowledge better understanding to the effect of higher Reynolds numbers and higher aspect ratios.",
keywords = "CFD-ANSYS, Mechanical properties, Navier-stokes equation, Term--orifice",
author = "Siba, {Mohamed A.} and {Wan Mahmood}, {Wan Mohd Faizal} and Nuawi, {Mohd. Zaki} and {Mohammad Rasani}, {Mohammad Rasidi} and Nassir, {Mohamed H.}",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "36--41",
journal = "International Journal of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering",
issn = "2227-2771",
publisher = "IJENS Publishers",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Wall pressure due to turbulent flow through orifice plate

AU - Siba, Mohamed A.

AU - Wan Mahmood, Wan Mohd Faizal

AU - Nuawi, Mohd. Zaki

AU - Mohammad Rasani, Mohammad Rasidi

AU - Nassir, Mohamed H.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Flow velocity and pressure are two related phenomena in the flowing fluid in a pipe containing an orifice. In this study, the focus will be on the pressure which is known to researchers under variety of names such as pressure distribution, pressure fluctuation, static pressure, pressure loss, or line pressure. This pressure (not the dynamic pressure) is triggered by the disturbance of the flow passed the orifice as the flow contract spinning, rotation, and circulation through which the flow transiently causes pressure on the wall which increasingly becomes a real concern to the designers of piping circuit of nuclear plant, turbines, or, more importantly, the flow measurement. Navier-Stocks equations have been employed to describe the velocity, pressure, stress, vorticity, strain, and total deformation using commercial CFD code ANSYS for incompressible fluid. The pressure fluctuation in conjunction with flow velocity was studied at three aspect ratios of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 at Reynolds number of 10000, 20000, and 30000. The study shows a strong correlation between the flow velocity (directly related to Reynolds number) and both the pressure and the stress acting on the wall. The axial maximum magnitude of the velocity and pressure appear around the orifice plate and both diminish beyond that. Vorticity and flow velocity are well correlated and are in good agreement with previous studies. The maximum stress, strain, and total deformation have powerful effect on wall at aspect ratio of 0.2 while this effect is almost nullified when the aspect ratio is higher. The study adds to the body of knowledge better understanding to the effect of higher Reynolds numbers and higher aspect ratios.

AB - Flow velocity and pressure are two related phenomena in the flowing fluid in a pipe containing an orifice. In this study, the focus will be on the pressure which is known to researchers under variety of names such as pressure distribution, pressure fluctuation, static pressure, pressure loss, or line pressure. This pressure (not the dynamic pressure) is triggered by the disturbance of the flow passed the orifice as the flow contract spinning, rotation, and circulation through which the flow transiently causes pressure on the wall which increasingly becomes a real concern to the designers of piping circuit of nuclear plant, turbines, or, more importantly, the flow measurement. Navier-Stocks equations have been employed to describe the velocity, pressure, stress, vorticity, strain, and total deformation using commercial CFD code ANSYS for incompressible fluid. The pressure fluctuation in conjunction with flow velocity was studied at three aspect ratios of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 at Reynolds number of 10000, 20000, and 30000. The study shows a strong correlation between the flow velocity (directly related to Reynolds number) and both the pressure and the stress acting on the wall. The axial maximum magnitude of the velocity and pressure appear around the orifice plate and both diminish beyond that. Vorticity and flow velocity are well correlated and are in good agreement with previous studies. The maximum stress, strain, and total deformation have powerful effect on wall at aspect ratio of 0.2 while this effect is almost nullified when the aspect ratio is higher. The study adds to the body of knowledge better understanding to the effect of higher Reynolds numbers and higher aspect ratios.

KW - CFD-ANSYS

KW - Mechanical properties

KW - Navier-stokes equation

KW - Term--orifice

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930801418&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84930801418&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 36

EP - 41

JO - International Journal of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering

JF - International Journal of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering

SN - 2227-2771

IS - 2

ER -