Voltage stabilization of thermoelectric modules using a boost converter

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thermoelectric Modules are a useful way to extract waste energy such as exhaust heat from car engines. It works on the Seebeck effect, where an electromotive force will be generated when the junction of two dissimilar metals experience a temperature difference. The efficiency of these modules are low, but advantages of being small, lightweight and maintenance-free make it an attractive addition to applications where energy per unit weight or size is a primary factor. Among the key problems is obtaining a consistent voltage to power devices which depend on a consistent voltage more than maximum power. In applications where a higher voltage than the input voltage is needed, a boost convertor is able to reach the desired voltage at the expense of reducing current. This experiment aims to assess the performance of thermoelectric modules when connected to a boost convertor, taking into account: input and output voltage, current and power, as well as convertor efficiency against various temperature differences. The experimental test rig is using two HZ-20 thermoelectric modules connected in series to a 0.9-5V to 5V boost convertor. The hot side of the thermoelectric modules were heated through a heating block while the cold side were water cooled at room temperature through cooling blocks. The surface temperature region near the hot air inlet and outlet is measured using a temperature sensors and thermal imager. Testing showed that at a temperature difference of 71°C, the input voltage and current of 1.76V and 0.76A were increased and decreased respectively to 4.17V and 0.17A. At a temperature difference of 135°C, the input voltage and current of 4.09V and 0.89A were increased and decreased respectively to 5.14V and 0.66A. It was also noted that the efficiency of the boost conversion increases with temperature difference, ranging from 53% at 71°C to 93% at 135°C. In conclusion, the usage of a boost convertor is able to increase the input voltage, decrease the input current, and reduce the range of output voltage over a range of temperature differences. The conversion process is also more efficient when the input voltage is close to the desired output voltage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-122
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering
Volume15
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Stabilization
Electric potential
Temperature
Seebeck effect
Dissimilar metals
Electromotive force
Air intakes
Temperature sensors
Image sensors
Railroad cars
Engines
Cooling
Heating
Testing

Keywords

  • Heat transfer
  • Power conditioning
  • Renewable energy
  • Thermoelectrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

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title = "Voltage stabilization of thermoelectric modules using a boost converter",
abstract = "Thermoelectric Modules are a useful way to extract waste energy such as exhaust heat from car engines. It works on the Seebeck effect, where an electromotive force will be generated when the junction of two dissimilar metals experience a temperature difference. The efficiency of these modules are low, but advantages of being small, lightweight and maintenance-free make it an attractive addition to applications where energy per unit weight or size is a primary factor. Among the key problems is obtaining a consistent voltage to power devices which depend on a consistent voltage more than maximum power. In applications where a higher voltage than the input voltage is needed, a boost convertor is able to reach the desired voltage at the expense of reducing current. This experiment aims to assess the performance of thermoelectric modules when connected to a boost convertor, taking into account: input and output voltage, current and power, as well as convertor efficiency against various temperature differences. The experimental test rig is using two HZ-20 thermoelectric modules connected in series to a 0.9-5V to 5V boost convertor. The hot side of the thermoelectric modules were heated through a heating block while the cold side were water cooled at room temperature through cooling blocks. The surface temperature region near the hot air inlet and outlet is measured using a temperature sensors and thermal imager. Testing showed that at a temperature difference of 71°C, the input voltage and current of 1.76V and 0.76A were increased and decreased respectively to 4.17V and 0.17A. At a temperature difference of 135°C, the input voltage and current of 4.09V and 0.89A were increased and decreased respectively to 5.14V and 0.66A. It was also noted that the efficiency of the boost conversion increases with temperature difference, ranging from 53{\%} at 71°C to 93{\%} at 135°C. In conclusion, the usage of a boost convertor is able to increase the input voltage, decrease the input current, and reduce the range of output voltage over a range of temperature differences. The conversion process is also more efficient when the input voltage is close to the desired output voltage.",
keywords = "Heat transfer, Power conditioning, Renewable energy, Thermoelectrics",
author = "Jason Sim and Rozli Zulkifli and Shahrir Abdullah and Zambri Harun",
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T1 - Voltage stabilization of thermoelectric modules using a boost converter

AU - Sim, Jason

AU - Zulkifli, Rozli

AU - Abdullah, Shahrir

AU - Harun, Zambri

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Thermoelectric Modules are a useful way to extract waste energy such as exhaust heat from car engines. It works on the Seebeck effect, where an electromotive force will be generated when the junction of two dissimilar metals experience a temperature difference. The efficiency of these modules are low, but advantages of being small, lightweight and maintenance-free make it an attractive addition to applications where energy per unit weight or size is a primary factor. Among the key problems is obtaining a consistent voltage to power devices which depend on a consistent voltage more than maximum power. In applications where a higher voltage than the input voltage is needed, a boost convertor is able to reach the desired voltage at the expense of reducing current. This experiment aims to assess the performance of thermoelectric modules when connected to a boost convertor, taking into account: input and output voltage, current and power, as well as convertor efficiency against various temperature differences. The experimental test rig is using two HZ-20 thermoelectric modules connected in series to a 0.9-5V to 5V boost convertor. The hot side of the thermoelectric modules were heated through a heating block while the cold side were water cooled at room temperature through cooling blocks. The surface temperature region near the hot air inlet and outlet is measured using a temperature sensors and thermal imager. Testing showed that at a temperature difference of 71°C, the input voltage and current of 1.76V and 0.76A were increased and decreased respectively to 4.17V and 0.17A. At a temperature difference of 135°C, the input voltage and current of 4.09V and 0.89A were increased and decreased respectively to 5.14V and 0.66A. It was also noted that the efficiency of the boost conversion increases with temperature difference, ranging from 53% at 71°C to 93% at 135°C. In conclusion, the usage of a boost convertor is able to increase the input voltage, decrease the input current, and reduce the range of output voltage over a range of temperature differences. The conversion process is also more efficient when the input voltage is close to the desired output voltage.

AB - Thermoelectric Modules are a useful way to extract waste energy such as exhaust heat from car engines. It works on the Seebeck effect, where an electromotive force will be generated when the junction of two dissimilar metals experience a temperature difference. The efficiency of these modules are low, but advantages of being small, lightweight and maintenance-free make it an attractive addition to applications where energy per unit weight or size is a primary factor. Among the key problems is obtaining a consistent voltage to power devices which depend on a consistent voltage more than maximum power. In applications where a higher voltage than the input voltage is needed, a boost convertor is able to reach the desired voltage at the expense of reducing current. This experiment aims to assess the performance of thermoelectric modules when connected to a boost convertor, taking into account: input and output voltage, current and power, as well as convertor efficiency against various temperature differences. The experimental test rig is using two HZ-20 thermoelectric modules connected in series to a 0.9-5V to 5V boost convertor. The hot side of the thermoelectric modules were heated through a heating block while the cold side were water cooled at room temperature through cooling blocks. The surface temperature region near the hot air inlet and outlet is measured using a temperature sensors and thermal imager. Testing showed that at a temperature difference of 71°C, the input voltage and current of 1.76V and 0.76A were increased and decreased respectively to 4.17V and 0.17A. At a temperature difference of 135°C, the input voltage and current of 4.09V and 0.89A were increased and decreased respectively to 5.14V and 0.66A. It was also noted that the efficiency of the boost conversion increases with temperature difference, ranging from 53% at 71°C to 93% at 135°C. In conclusion, the usage of a boost convertor is able to increase the input voltage, decrease the input current, and reduce the range of output voltage over a range of temperature differences. The conversion process is also more efficient when the input voltage is close to the desired output voltage.

KW - Heat transfer

KW - Power conditioning

KW - Renewable energy

KW - Thermoelectrics

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