Vitamin C and bone health

Evidence from cell, animal and human studies

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Vitamin C, traditionally associated with scurvy, is an important nutrient for maintaining bone health. It is essential in the production of collagen in bone matrix. It also scavenges free radicals detrimental to bone health. Objective: This review aims to assess the current evidence of the bone-sparing effects of vitamin C derived from cell, animal and human studies. Results: Cell studies showed that vitamin C was able to induce osteoblast and osteoclast formation. However, high-dose vitamin C might increase oxidative stress and subsequently lead to cell death. Vitamin C-deficient animals showed impaired bone health due to increased osteoclast formation and decreased bone formation. Vitamin C supplementation was able to prevent bone loss in several animal models of bone loss. Human studies generally showed a positive relationship between vitamin C and bone health, indicated by bone mineral density, fracture probability and bone turnover markers. Some studies suggested that the relationship between vitamin C and bone health could be U-shaped, more prominent in certain subgroups and different between dietary and supplemental form. However, most of the studies were observational, thus could not confirm causality. One clinical trial was performed, but it was not a randomized controlled trial, thus confounding factors could not be excluded. Conclusion: vitamin C may exert beneficial effects on bone, but more rigorous studies and clinical trials should be performed to validate this claim.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-450
Number of pages12
JournalCurrent Drug Targets
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

Fingerprint

Ascorbic Acid
Bone
Animals
Health
Bone and Bones
Osteoclasts
Clinical Trials
Scurvy
Bone Matrix
Bone Remodeling
Osteoblasts
Osteogenesis
Causality
Bone Density
Free Radicals
Observational Studies
Oxidative stress
Oxidative Stress
Cell Death
Collagen

Keywords

  • Ascorbic acid
  • Bone
  • Osteoblast
  • Osteoclast
  • Osteoporosis
  • Vitamin C

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Vitamin C and bone health : Evidence from cell, animal and human studies. / Kok Yong, Chin; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana.

In: Current Drug Targets, Vol. 19, No. 5, 01.04.2018, p. 439-450.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{b0e09017ff994703900b4ab90b074453,
title = "Vitamin C and bone health: Evidence from cell, animal and human studies",
abstract = "Background: Vitamin C, traditionally associated with scurvy, is an important nutrient for maintaining bone health. It is essential in the production of collagen in bone matrix. It also scavenges free radicals detrimental to bone health. Objective: This review aims to assess the current evidence of the bone-sparing effects of vitamin C derived from cell, animal and human studies. Results: Cell studies showed that vitamin C was able to induce osteoblast and osteoclast formation. However, high-dose vitamin C might increase oxidative stress and subsequently lead to cell death. Vitamin C-deficient animals showed impaired bone health due to increased osteoclast formation and decreased bone formation. Vitamin C supplementation was able to prevent bone loss in several animal models of bone loss. Human studies generally showed a positive relationship between vitamin C and bone health, indicated by bone mineral density, fracture probability and bone turnover markers. Some studies suggested that the relationship between vitamin C and bone health could be U-shaped, more prominent in certain subgroups and different between dietary and supplemental form. However, most of the studies were observational, thus could not confirm causality. One clinical trial was performed, but it was not a randomized controlled trial, thus confounding factors could not be excluded. Conclusion: vitamin C may exert beneficial effects on bone, but more rigorous studies and clinical trials should be performed to validate this claim.",
keywords = "Ascorbic acid, Bone, Osteoblast, Osteoclast, Osteoporosis, Vitamin C",
author = "{Kok Yong}, Chin and Soelaiman, {Ima Nirwana}",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2174/1389450116666150907100838",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "439--450",
journal = "Current Drug Targets",
issn = "1389-4501",
publisher = "Bentham Science Publishers B.V.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vitamin C and bone health

T2 - Evidence from cell, animal and human studies

AU - Kok Yong, Chin

AU - Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana

PY - 2018/4/1

Y1 - 2018/4/1

N2 - Background: Vitamin C, traditionally associated with scurvy, is an important nutrient for maintaining bone health. It is essential in the production of collagen in bone matrix. It also scavenges free radicals detrimental to bone health. Objective: This review aims to assess the current evidence of the bone-sparing effects of vitamin C derived from cell, animal and human studies. Results: Cell studies showed that vitamin C was able to induce osteoblast and osteoclast formation. However, high-dose vitamin C might increase oxidative stress and subsequently lead to cell death. Vitamin C-deficient animals showed impaired bone health due to increased osteoclast formation and decreased bone formation. Vitamin C supplementation was able to prevent bone loss in several animal models of bone loss. Human studies generally showed a positive relationship between vitamin C and bone health, indicated by bone mineral density, fracture probability and bone turnover markers. Some studies suggested that the relationship between vitamin C and bone health could be U-shaped, more prominent in certain subgroups and different between dietary and supplemental form. However, most of the studies were observational, thus could not confirm causality. One clinical trial was performed, but it was not a randomized controlled trial, thus confounding factors could not be excluded. Conclusion: vitamin C may exert beneficial effects on bone, but more rigorous studies and clinical trials should be performed to validate this claim.

AB - Background: Vitamin C, traditionally associated with scurvy, is an important nutrient for maintaining bone health. It is essential in the production of collagen in bone matrix. It also scavenges free radicals detrimental to bone health. Objective: This review aims to assess the current evidence of the bone-sparing effects of vitamin C derived from cell, animal and human studies. Results: Cell studies showed that vitamin C was able to induce osteoblast and osteoclast formation. However, high-dose vitamin C might increase oxidative stress and subsequently lead to cell death. Vitamin C-deficient animals showed impaired bone health due to increased osteoclast formation and decreased bone formation. Vitamin C supplementation was able to prevent bone loss in several animal models of bone loss. Human studies generally showed a positive relationship between vitamin C and bone health, indicated by bone mineral density, fracture probability and bone turnover markers. Some studies suggested that the relationship between vitamin C and bone health could be U-shaped, more prominent in certain subgroups and different between dietary and supplemental form. However, most of the studies were observational, thus could not confirm causality. One clinical trial was performed, but it was not a randomized controlled trial, thus confounding factors could not be excluded. Conclusion: vitamin C may exert beneficial effects on bone, but more rigorous studies and clinical trials should be performed to validate this claim.

KW - Ascorbic acid

KW - Bone

KW - Osteoblast

KW - Osteoclast

KW - Osteoporosis

KW - Vitamin C

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85045980063&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85045980063&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2174/1389450116666150907100838

DO - 10.2174/1389450116666150907100838

M3 - Review article

VL - 19

SP - 439

EP - 450

JO - Current Drug Targets

JF - Current Drug Targets

SN - 1389-4501

IS - 5

ER -