Visual function of preterm children

A review from a primary eye care centre

Bariah Mohd. Ali, Ahmad Asmah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To understand the pattern of visual development in preterm children attending a primary eye care centre in Malaysia. To improve the knowledge and management of preterm children in the South East Asian region. Methods: Clinical records of preterm babies born from 2000 to 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. Follow-up data from 1 to 6 years were also reviewed. Data collected included; gender, race, age at birth, current age, birth weight, and current weight, record of fundus examination, visual acuity (VA), refraction and strabismus. Results: A total of 102 records were reviewed. Of these, 48 (47.1%) were males and 54 (52.9) were females, with 60 (58.8%) Malays, 20 (19.6%) Chinese, 21 (20.6%) Indian and 1 (1%) Caucasian. The average gestational age was 30.83 ± 2.42 weeks and average birth weight was 1.37 ± 0.36 kg. Around 38 (37.3%) of them had retinopathy of premature (ROP) and 64 (62.7%) were without ROP. Improvement of VA was observed with age. Children with ROP developed myopia with age and those without ROP became mostly hyperopic. Linear regression analysis indicated that degree of myopia is significantly associated with severity of ROP and birth weight. No significant increment of astigmatism was noted with age. Only 13.7% of them had strabismus. Conclusions: This study concludes that children with ROP developed myopia with age and those without ROP became more hyperopic. Degree of myopia is associated with severity of ROP and birth weight. These factors should be considered during screening of vision and refractive error in children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-109
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Optometry
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

Fingerprint

Myopia
Primary Health Care
Birth Weight
Strabismus
Premature Birth
Visual Acuity
Vision Screening
Knowledge Management
Refractive Errors
Astigmatism
Malaysia
Gestational Age
Linear Models
Regression Analysis
Parturition
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Prematurity
  • Refractive error
  • Retinopathy of prematurity
  • Strabismus
  • Visual functions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Optometry

Cite this

Visual function of preterm children : A review from a primary eye care centre. / Mohd. Ali, Bariah; Asmah, Ahmad.

In: Journal of Optometry, Vol. 4, No. 3, 07.2011, p. 103-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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