Video recordings of oral presentations

A neuroscience intervention in ESP instruction

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Developments in cognitive neuroscience provide insights into the motivating role of how technology combined with brain processing offers enormous potential for language instruction. This study discusses on how video recordings facilitate learning as well as offer exciting possibilities for meeting the oral presentation needs of undergraduate engineers in an English for Specific Purpose (ESP) classroom. The study aims to investigate the undergraduate engineers' self-reflections and peer reflections of their presentations that were video-recorded using their cell phones as well as their opinions related to the activity of viewing and discussing the video-recorded presentations. The participants of this qualitative case study comprise of ten Manufacturing engineering undergraduates who are limited users of the English language. The research instruments used in this study include 10 video recordings and three types of reflection forms. The foundations for the implementation of this study is based on Mayer's Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning. Findings indicate that the participants had reflected more on their weaknesses rather than their strengths. The activity had been very meaningful and motivating and has enabled these limited users of the language to be enthusiastic and critically engaged in activities related to oral presentations. The assessment-5 environment has provided them the opportunity to practice oral presentation skills in a low anxiety atmosphere besides developing capacity to monitor the quality of their own work as well as their peers'. They have also been given the autonomy to negotiate new active roles by harnessing the affordances of technology. This study hence stresses on the importance for language instructors to understand neuroscience research implications in language learning as it would be an invaluable asset in 21st Century classrooms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2987-2994
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Sciences (Pakistan)
Volume11
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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video recording
neurosciences
instruction
engineer
video
language
learning
language instruction
classroom
cell phone
cognitive theory
reflexivity
multimedia
English language
instructor
brain
assets
manufacturing
autonomy
engineering

Keywords

  • Brain processing
  • Cognitive neuroscience
  • Oral presentatiom
  • Reflections
  • Video recordings

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Video recordings of oral presentations : A neuroscience intervention in ESP instruction. / Devi, Indra; N. Krishnasamy, Pramela Krish.

In: Social Sciences (Pakistan), Vol. 11, No. 12, 2016, p. 2987-2994.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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