Ventricular bigeminy following a cobra envenomation

Ahmad Khaldun Ismail, Scott A. Weinstein, Mark Auliya, Prakashrao Appareo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context. Envenoming by some species of cobras (Naja species) may include cardiotoxic effects including various dysrhythmias. However, dysrhythmias leading specifically to ventricular bigeminy have not been previously documented. We report a case of cardiotoxicity and the development of ventricular bigeminy following a cobra envenomation. Case details. The patient was a 23-year-old man who presented to an emergency department following an alleged cobra bite. There was transient episode of nausea, vomiting, hypotension and tachycardia. The ECG showed infrequent ventricular ectopics that progressed to ventricular bigeminy and persisted even after the vital signs normalized. Complete resolution and resumption of normal sinus rhythm occurred following an empirical administration of monovalent antivenom against Naja kaouthia venom. The patient was discharged after 24 hours of uneventful observation. Discussion. The patient's concomitant local effects, episodic cardiovascular instability and evolution of ventricular bigeminy support the likelihood of a venom-induced disease. Ventricular bigeminy can develop following a cobra envenomation. Thorough clinical evaluation, close serial observation of vital signs and early continuous cardiac monitoring are important in Naja spp. bites.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)518-521
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Toxicology
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2012

Fingerprint

Antivenins
Elapidae
Venoms
Electrocardiography
Monitoring
Vital Signs
Bites and Stings
Observation
Tachycardia
Hypotension
Nausea
Vomiting
Naja kaouthia venom
Hospital Emergency Service

Keywords

  • Arrhythmia
  • Cardiotoxicity
  • Emergency
  • Envenomation
  • Naja sp.
  • Snakebite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Cite this

Ventricular bigeminy following a cobra envenomation. / Ismail, Ahmad Khaldun; Weinstein, Scott A.; Auliya, Mark; Appareo, Prakashrao.

In: Clinical Toxicology, Vol. 50, No. 6, 07.2012, p. 518-521.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ismail, Ahmad Khaldun ; Weinstein, Scott A. ; Auliya, Mark ; Appareo, Prakashrao. / Ventricular bigeminy following a cobra envenomation. In: Clinical Toxicology. 2012 ; Vol. 50, No. 6. pp. 518-521.
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