Usefulness of stable microbubble test of tracheal aspirate for the diagnosis of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

N. Y. Boo, K. B. Cheong, S. K. Cheong, M. S. Lye, M. A. Zulfiqar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To compare the overall accuracy of the stable microbubble test (SM test) with measurement of level of surfactant protein A (SP-A) of tracheal aspirate for the diagnosis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Methodology: Tracheal aspirates were obtained from neonates on ventilatory support. The SM test was carried out on specimens of tracheal aspirate immediately after collection. Levels of SP-A in tracheal aspirates were determined by enzyme. Linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The results of the SM test and SP-A level of the tracheal aspirates were compared against the clinical diagnosis of RDS based on clinical, radiological and bacteriological findings. Results: Both the median microbubble counts (6 microbubbles/mm2 range = 0-90) and median SP-A levels (100μg/L, range = 0- 67 447) of infants with RDS were significantly lower than those of infants with no obvious lung pathology (P<0.0001), and pneumonia (P <0.0001). The SM test of tracheal aspirates had higher overall accuracy for the diagnosis of RDS than measurement of SP-A levels [94.6% vs 82.4%). When the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of both tests for RDS were compared, the area under the ROC curve of the SM test was larger (0.9689) than that of the SP-A method (0.8965). Conclusions: This study showed that the SM test of tracheal aspirate was a useful bedside diagnostic test for RDS. It could be carried out at any time after birth on infants requiring ventilatory support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-334
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Volume33
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Newborn Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Microbubbles
Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein A
ROC Curve
Immunosorbents
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Pneumonia
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Parturition
Newborn Infant
Pathology
Lung

Keywords

  • Respiratory distress syndrome
  • Stable microbubble test
  • Tracheal aspirates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Usefulness of stable microbubble test of tracheal aspirate for the diagnosis of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. / Boo, N. Y.; Cheong, K. B.; Cheong, S. K.; Lye, M. S.; Zulfiqar, M. A.

In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, Vol. 33, No. 4, 1997, p. 329-334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boo, N. Y. ; Cheong, K. B. ; Cheong, S. K. ; Lye, M. S. ; Zulfiqar, M. A. / Usefulness of stable microbubble test of tracheal aspirate for the diagnosis of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health. 1997 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 329-334.
@article{c6aa3e4a9a4646d588a53064500ccc60,
title = "Usefulness of stable microbubble test of tracheal aspirate for the diagnosis of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome",
abstract = "Objectives: To compare the overall accuracy of the stable microbubble test (SM test) with measurement of level of surfactant protein A (SP-A) of tracheal aspirate for the diagnosis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Methodology: Tracheal aspirates were obtained from neonates on ventilatory support. The SM test was carried out on specimens of tracheal aspirate immediately after collection. Levels of SP-A in tracheal aspirates were determined by enzyme. Linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The results of the SM test and SP-A level of the tracheal aspirates were compared against the clinical diagnosis of RDS based on clinical, radiological and bacteriological findings. Results: Both the median microbubble counts (6 microbubbles/mm2 range = 0-90) and median SP-A levels (100μg/L, range = 0- 67 447) of infants with RDS were significantly lower than those of infants with no obvious lung pathology (P<0.0001), and pneumonia (P <0.0001). The SM test of tracheal aspirates had higher overall accuracy for the diagnosis of RDS than measurement of SP-A levels [94.6{\%} vs 82.4{\%}). When the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of both tests for RDS were compared, the area under the ROC curve of the SM test was larger (0.9689) than that of the SP-A method (0.8965). Conclusions: This study showed that the SM test of tracheal aspirate was a useful bedside diagnostic test for RDS. It could be carried out at any time after birth on infants requiring ventilatory support.",
keywords = "Respiratory distress syndrome, Stable microbubble test, Tracheal aspirates",
author = "Boo, {N. Y.} and Cheong, {K. B.} and Cheong, {S. K.} and Lye, {M. S.} and Zulfiqar, {M. A.}",
year = "1997",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "329--334",
journal = "Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health",
issn = "1034-4810",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Usefulness of stable microbubble test of tracheal aspirate for the diagnosis of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

AU - Boo, N. Y.

AU - Cheong, K. B.

AU - Cheong, S. K.

AU - Lye, M. S.

AU - Zulfiqar, M. A.

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - Objectives: To compare the overall accuracy of the stable microbubble test (SM test) with measurement of level of surfactant protein A (SP-A) of tracheal aspirate for the diagnosis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Methodology: Tracheal aspirates were obtained from neonates on ventilatory support. The SM test was carried out on specimens of tracheal aspirate immediately after collection. Levels of SP-A in tracheal aspirates were determined by enzyme. Linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The results of the SM test and SP-A level of the tracheal aspirates were compared against the clinical diagnosis of RDS based on clinical, radiological and bacteriological findings. Results: Both the median microbubble counts (6 microbubbles/mm2 range = 0-90) and median SP-A levels (100μg/L, range = 0- 67 447) of infants with RDS were significantly lower than those of infants with no obvious lung pathology (P<0.0001), and pneumonia (P <0.0001). The SM test of tracheal aspirates had higher overall accuracy for the diagnosis of RDS than measurement of SP-A levels [94.6% vs 82.4%). When the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of both tests for RDS were compared, the area under the ROC curve of the SM test was larger (0.9689) than that of the SP-A method (0.8965). Conclusions: This study showed that the SM test of tracheal aspirate was a useful bedside diagnostic test for RDS. It could be carried out at any time after birth on infants requiring ventilatory support.

AB - Objectives: To compare the overall accuracy of the stable microbubble test (SM test) with measurement of level of surfactant protein A (SP-A) of tracheal aspirate for the diagnosis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Methodology: Tracheal aspirates were obtained from neonates on ventilatory support. The SM test was carried out on specimens of tracheal aspirate immediately after collection. Levels of SP-A in tracheal aspirates were determined by enzyme. Linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The results of the SM test and SP-A level of the tracheal aspirates were compared against the clinical diagnosis of RDS based on clinical, radiological and bacteriological findings. Results: Both the median microbubble counts (6 microbubbles/mm2 range = 0-90) and median SP-A levels (100μg/L, range = 0- 67 447) of infants with RDS were significantly lower than those of infants with no obvious lung pathology (P<0.0001), and pneumonia (P <0.0001). The SM test of tracheal aspirates had higher overall accuracy for the diagnosis of RDS than measurement of SP-A levels [94.6% vs 82.4%). When the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of both tests for RDS were compared, the area under the ROC curve of the SM test was larger (0.9689) than that of the SP-A method (0.8965). Conclusions: This study showed that the SM test of tracheal aspirate was a useful bedside diagnostic test for RDS. It could be carried out at any time after birth on infants requiring ventilatory support.

KW - Respiratory distress syndrome

KW - Stable microbubble test

KW - Tracheal aspirates

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030824125&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030824125&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 329

EP - 334

JO - Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health

JF - Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health

SN - 1034-4810

IS - 4

ER -