Use of octreotide and lanreotide in the treatment of symptomatic non-resectable carcinoid tumours

Rohaizak Muhammad, John Richard Farndon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Carcinoid tumours are rare neoplasms that secrete hormones and biogenic amines, most commonly serotonin. Octreotide and long acting lanreotide are found to be useful in the management of carcinoid syndrome by its interaction with somatostatin receptor, found on the carcinoid tumour. The aim of this study is to look at the efficacy of octreotide and long acting lanreotide in the treatment of symptomatic non-resectable carcinoid tumours. Method: The effects of octreotide and long-acting lanreotide were studied in 10 patients with symptomatic non-resectable carcinoid tumours. Results: Symptom improvement occurred in nine of 10 patients. Three patients responded only to octreotide, three patients responded to both octreotide and long-acting lanreotide and three patients only responded to long-acting lanreotide. Slight reductions in 24-h urine 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels occurred in three of six patients but no patients were found to have objective tumour regression on computed tomography scan. Conclusions: Octreotide and long-acting lanreotide are useful palliative treatments for the control of symptoms in patients with non-resectable carcinoid tumours but there is no evidence of tumour stasis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)635-638
Number of pages4
JournalANZ Journal of Surgery
Volume72
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Octreotide
Carcinoid Tumor
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Somatostatin Receptors
Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid
Biogenic Amines
lanreotide
Palliative Care
Serotonin
Tomography
Urine
Hormones

Keywords

  • Carcinoid
  • Lanreotide
  • Neuroendocrine tumour
  • Octreotide
  • Sandostatin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Use of octreotide and lanreotide in the treatment of symptomatic non-resectable carcinoid tumours. / Muhammad, Rohaizak; Farndon, John Richard.

In: ANZ Journal of Surgery, Vol. 72, No. 9, 2002, p. 635-638.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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