Understanding the effects of alkali pretreatment and acid treatment of oil palm trunk fibres

Balqis Az Zahraa Norizan, Nur Syafiqah Sauta, Sharifah Nurul Ain Syed Hashim, Sarani Zakaria, Muhammad Fauzi Daud, Babul Airianah Othman, Sharifah Nabihah Syed Jaafar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cellulose is becoming a super-material due to its excellent properties and renewability. Understanding its resistance to chemical treatments is important to boost the usage and accessibility. In this study, oil palm trunk fibre (OPTF) was pretreated with NaOH and NH4OH either in an autoclave or in a water bath. The optimised alkaline pretreated samples were then subjected to acid treatment with acetic acid (AA). The results showed the highest delignification was achieved by using 12% of NaOH via the autoclaving process, with 10685.4 mg/L of lignin and 7.8% of acid insoluble lignin (AIL). The Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) analysis confirmed the removal of lignin by the reduction of the peaks at 1250 and 1750 cm-1, representing C=O and C-O-C, respectively, from lignin. The delignification was pronounced when concentrated AA was used and the lignin-to-cellulose ratio decreased to about 52%. Other than lignin, amorphous celluloses were also removed during the AA treatment, causing an increment in the crystallinity index (CrI) and crystallite size (L). Consequently, the AA treatment had led to the depolymerisation of crystalline cellulose and affected the viscosity-average molecular weight (Mn).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1001-1008
Number of pages8
JournalCellulose Chemistry and Technology
Volume53
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Palm oil
Lignin
Alkalies
Acetic acid
Cellulose
Acetic Acid
Acids
Fibers
Delignification
Depolymerization
Autoclaves
Crystallite size
Fourier transforms
Molecular weight
Viscosity
Crystalline materials
Infrared radiation
Water

Keywords

  • Cellulose
  • Crystallinity index
  • Lignin
  • Peak area ratio
  • Viscosity-average molecular weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organic Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Understanding the effects of alkali pretreatment and acid treatment of oil palm trunk fibres. / Norizan, Balqis Az Zahraa; Sauta, Nur Syafiqah; Hashim, Sharifah Nurul Ain Syed; Zakaria, Sarani; Daud, Muhammad Fauzi; Othman, Babul Airianah; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed.

In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, Vol. 53, No. 9, 01.01.2019, p. 1001-1008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Norizan, Balqis Az Zahraa ; Sauta, Nur Syafiqah ; Hashim, Sharifah Nurul Ain Syed ; Zakaria, Sarani ; Daud, Muhammad Fauzi ; Othman, Babul Airianah ; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed. / Understanding the effects of alkali pretreatment and acid treatment of oil palm trunk fibres. In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology. 2019 ; Vol. 53, No. 9. pp. 1001-1008.
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