Tumour biology of obesity-related cancers: understanding the molecular concept for better diagnosis and treatment

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity continues to be a major global problem. Various cancers are related to obesity and proper understanding of their aetiology, especially their molecular tumour biology is important for early diagnosis and better treatment. Genes play an important role in the development of obesity. Few genes such as leptin, leptin receptor encoded by the db (diabetes), pro-opiomelanocortin, AgRP and NPY and melanocortin-4 receptors and insulin-induced gene 2 were linked to obesity. MicroRNAs control gene expression via mRNA degradation and protein translation inhibition and influence cell differentiation, cell growth and cell death. Overexpression of miR-143 inhibits tumour growth by suppressing B cell lymphoma 2, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5 activities and KRAS oncogene. Cancers of the breast, uterus, renal, thyroid and liver are also related to obesity. Any disturbance in the production of sex hormones and insulin, leads to distortion in the balance between cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The possible mechanism linking obesity to cancer involves alteration in the level of adipokines and sex hormones. These mediators act as biomarkers for cancer progression and act as targets for cancer therapy and prevention. Interestingly, many anti-cancerous drugs are also beneficial in treating obesity and vice versa. We also reviewed the possible link in the mechanism of few drugs which act both on cancer and obesity. The present review may be important for molecular biologists, oncologists and clinicians treating cancers and also pave the way for better therapeutic options.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14363-14380
Number of pages18
JournalTumor Biology
Volume37
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2016

Fingerprint

Obesity
Neoplasms
Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Protein Biosynthesis
Therapeutics
Cell Differentiation
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 7
Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4
Insulin
Genes
Leptin Receptors
Pro-Opiomelanocortin
Uterine Neoplasms
Adipokines
RNA Stability
B-Cell Lymphoma
Tumor Biomarkers
Growth
Leptin
MicroRNAs

Keywords

  • Aetiology
  • Cancer
  • Drugs
  • Genes
  • miRNA
  • Molecular biology
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Tumour biology of obesity-related cancers : understanding the molecular concept for better diagnosis and treatment. / Teoh, Seong Lin; Das, Srijit.

In: Tumor Biology, Vol. 37, No. 11, 01.11.2016, p. 14363-14380.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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