Trust-in-supervisor and helping coworkers

Moderating effect of perceived politics

June M L Poon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    50 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose - This study sought to examine the relationship between trust-in-supervisor and willingness to help coworkers as well as the moderating effect of perceptions of organizational politics on this relationship. Design/methodology/approach - A field survey using a structured questionnaire was used to gather data from 106 employees of a medium-sized company that had businesses in the manufacturing, travel, and education industries. Participation was voluntary and employees completed the questionnaire anonymously. Findings - Moderated multiple regression results indicated that trust-in-supervisor was positively related to employee willingness to help coworkers among employees perceiving low levels of organizational politics but not among those perceiving high levels of organizational politics. Research limitations/implications - The limitations of this study include reliance on cross-sectional data collected using self-reports from employees of a single organization. Future research should examine other forms of spontaneous workplace behaviors as outcomes of trust and identify other mitigating factors that may enhance or inhibit such behaviors. Future research also is needed to address the question of why trust predicts helping. Practical implications - Employers can realize the benefits of employee helpfulness stemming from supervisory trust only if they can establish a workplace that is not politically charged. Therefore, trust must be augmented with organizational interventions and strategies that discourage a high level of politicking. Originality/value - This study provides what is perhaps the first empirical test of the joint contribution of trust and perceptions of organizational politics on willingness to help. In addition, the findings of this study extend the organizational politics literature by showing that perceived politics might also act as a moderator of relationships.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)518-532
    Number of pages15
    JournalJournal of Managerial Psychology
    Volume21
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Fingerprint

    Politics
    Workplace
    Trust in supervisor
    Moderating effect
    Employees
    Self Report
    Industry
    Organizations
    Education
    Willingness
    Organizational politics
    Research
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Keywords

    • Employee relations
    • Line managers
    • Organizational culture
    • Trust

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Applied Psychology
    • Management Science and Operations Research
    • Social Psychology

    Cite this

    Trust-in-supervisor and helping coworkers : Moderating effect of perceived politics. / Poon, June M L.

    In: Journal of Managerial Psychology, Vol. 21, No. 6, 2006, p. 518-532.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{a4fcd1c441994c50b1f61f37fbdbbd90,
    title = "Trust-in-supervisor and helping coworkers: Moderating effect of perceived politics",
    abstract = "Purpose - This study sought to examine the relationship between trust-in-supervisor and willingness to help coworkers as well as the moderating effect of perceptions of organizational politics on this relationship. Design/methodology/approach - A field survey using a structured questionnaire was used to gather data from 106 employees of a medium-sized company that had businesses in the manufacturing, travel, and education industries. Participation was voluntary and employees completed the questionnaire anonymously. Findings - Moderated multiple regression results indicated that trust-in-supervisor was positively related to employee willingness to help coworkers among employees perceiving low levels of organizational politics but not among those perceiving high levels of organizational politics. Research limitations/implications - The limitations of this study include reliance on cross-sectional data collected using self-reports from employees of a single organization. Future research should examine other forms of spontaneous workplace behaviors as outcomes of trust and identify other mitigating factors that may enhance or inhibit such behaviors. Future research also is needed to address the question of why trust predicts helping. Practical implications - Employers can realize the benefits of employee helpfulness stemming from supervisory trust only if they can establish a workplace that is not politically charged. Therefore, trust must be augmented with organizational interventions and strategies that discourage a high level of politicking. Originality/value - This study provides what is perhaps the first empirical test of the joint contribution of trust and perceptions of organizational politics on willingness to help. In addition, the findings of this study extend the organizational politics literature by showing that perceived politics might also act as a moderator of relationships.",
    keywords = "Employee relations, Line managers, Organizational culture, Trust",
    author = "Poon, {June M L}",
    year = "2006",
    doi = "10.1108/02683940610684373",
    language = "English",
    volume = "21",
    pages = "518--532",
    journal = "Journal of Managerial Psychology",
    issn = "0268-3946",
    publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
    number = "6",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Trust-in-supervisor and helping coworkers

    T2 - Moderating effect of perceived politics

    AU - Poon, June M L

    PY - 2006

    Y1 - 2006

    N2 - Purpose - This study sought to examine the relationship between trust-in-supervisor and willingness to help coworkers as well as the moderating effect of perceptions of organizational politics on this relationship. Design/methodology/approach - A field survey using a structured questionnaire was used to gather data from 106 employees of a medium-sized company that had businesses in the manufacturing, travel, and education industries. Participation was voluntary and employees completed the questionnaire anonymously. Findings - Moderated multiple regression results indicated that trust-in-supervisor was positively related to employee willingness to help coworkers among employees perceiving low levels of organizational politics but not among those perceiving high levels of organizational politics. Research limitations/implications - The limitations of this study include reliance on cross-sectional data collected using self-reports from employees of a single organization. Future research should examine other forms of spontaneous workplace behaviors as outcomes of trust and identify other mitigating factors that may enhance or inhibit such behaviors. Future research also is needed to address the question of why trust predicts helping. Practical implications - Employers can realize the benefits of employee helpfulness stemming from supervisory trust only if they can establish a workplace that is not politically charged. Therefore, trust must be augmented with organizational interventions and strategies that discourage a high level of politicking. Originality/value - This study provides what is perhaps the first empirical test of the joint contribution of trust and perceptions of organizational politics on willingness to help. In addition, the findings of this study extend the organizational politics literature by showing that perceived politics might also act as a moderator of relationships.

    AB - Purpose - This study sought to examine the relationship between trust-in-supervisor and willingness to help coworkers as well as the moderating effect of perceptions of organizational politics on this relationship. Design/methodology/approach - A field survey using a structured questionnaire was used to gather data from 106 employees of a medium-sized company that had businesses in the manufacturing, travel, and education industries. Participation was voluntary and employees completed the questionnaire anonymously. Findings - Moderated multiple regression results indicated that trust-in-supervisor was positively related to employee willingness to help coworkers among employees perceiving low levels of organizational politics but not among those perceiving high levels of organizational politics. Research limitations/implications - The limitations of this study include reliance on cross-sectional data collected using self-reports from employees of a single organization. Future research should examine other forms of spontaneous workplace behaviors as outcomes of trust and identify other mitigating factors that may enhance or inhibit such behaviors. Future research also is needed to address the question of why trust predicts helping. Practical implications - Employers can realize the benefits of employee helpfulness stemming from supervisory trust only if they can establish a workplace that is not politically charged. Therefore, trust must be augmented with organizational interventions and strategies that discourage a high level of politicking. Originality/value - This study provides what is perhaps the first empirical test of the joint contribution of trust and perceptions of organizational politics on willingness to help. In addition, the findings of this study extend the organizational politics literature by showing that perceived politics might also act as a moderator of relationships.

    KW - Employee relations

    KW - Line managers

    KW - Organizational culture

    KW - Trust

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33747757969&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33747757969&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1108/02683940610684373

    DO - 10.1108/02683940610684373

    M3 - Article

    VL - 21

    SP - 518

    EP - 532

    JO - Journal of Managerial Psychology

    JF - Journal of Managerial Psychology

    SN - 0268-3946

    IS - 6

    ER -