Trends in atmospheric particulate matter in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and the vicinity

Md Masud Rana, Norela Sulaiman, Bjarne Sivertsen, Firoz Khan, Sabera Nasreen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dhaka and its neighboring areas suffer from severe air pollution, especially during dry season (November–April). We investigated temporal and directional variations in particulate matter (PM) concentrations in Dhaka, Gazipur, and Narayanganj from October 2012 to March 2015 to understand different aspects of PM concentrations and possible sources of high pollution in this region. Ninety-six-hour backward trajectories for the whole dry season were also computed to investigate incursion of long-range pollution into this area. We found yearly PM10 concentrations in this area about three times and yearly PM2.5 concentrations about six times greater than the national standards of Bangladesh. Dhaka and its vicinity experienced several air pollution episodes in dry season when PM2.5 concentrations were 8–13 times greater than the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline value. Higher pollution and great contribution of PM2.5 most of the time were associated with the north-westerly wind. Winter (November to January) was found as the most polluted season in this area, when average PM10 concentrations in Dhaka, Gazipur, and Narayanganj were 257.1, 240.3, and 327.4 μg m−3, respectively. Pollution levels during wet season (May–October) were, although found legitimate as per the national standards of Bangladesh, exceeded WHO guideline value in 50 % of the days of that season. Trans-boundary source identifications using concentration-weighted trajectory method revealed that the sources in the eastern Indian region bordering Bangladesh, in the north-eastern Indian region bordering Nepal and in Nepal and its neighboring areas had high probability of contributing to the PM pollutions at Gazipur station.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 26 May 2016

Fingerprint

Bangladesh
Particulate Matter
particulate matter
Pollution
pollution
dry season
World Health Organization
Nepal
Air pollution
Air Pollution
atmospheric pollution
trajectory
Trajectories
Health
Guidelines
westerly
wet season
atmospheric particulate
trend
winter

Keywords

  • Air quality
  • Backward trajectory
  • Long-range source
  • Meteorology
  • Particulate matter
  • Standard

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Pollution

Cite this

Trends in atmospheric particulate matter in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and the vicinity. / Rana, Md Masud; Sulaiman, Norela; Sivertsen, Bjarne; Khan, Firoz; Nasreen, Sabera.

In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 26.05.2016, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4333ef91696a490d955a5111a489d75b,
title = "Trends in atmospheric particulate matter in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and the vicinity",
abstract = "Dhaka and its neighboring areas suffer from severe air pollution, especially during dry season (November–April). We investigated temporal and directional variations in particulate matter (PM) concentrations in Dhaka, Gazipur, and Narayanganj from October 2012 to March 2015 to understand different aspects of PM concentrations and possible sources of high pollution in this region. Ninety-six-hour backward trajectories for the whole dry season were also computed to investigate incursion of long-range pollution into this area. We found yearly PM10 concentrations in this area about three times and yearly PM2.5 concentrations about six times greater than the national standards of Bangladesh. Dhaka and its vicinity experienced several air pollution episodes in dry season when PM2.5 concentrations were 8–13 times greater than the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline value. Higher pollution and great contribution of PM2.5 most of the time were associated with the north-westerly wind. Winter (November to January) was found as the most polluted season in this area, when average PM10 concentrations in Dhaka, Gazipur, and Narayanganj were 257.1, 240.3, and 327.4 μg m−3, respectively. Pollution levels during wet season (May–October) were, although found legitimate as per the national standards of Bangladesh, exceeded WHO guideline value in 50 {\%} of the days of that season. Trans-boundary source identifications using concentration-weighted trajectory method revealed that the sources in the eastern Indian region bordering Bangladesh, in the north-eastern Indian region bordering Nepal and in Nepal and its neighboring areas had high probability of contributing to the PM pollutions at Gazipur station.",
keywords = "Air quality, Backward trajectory, Long-range source, Meteorology, Particulate matter, Standard",
author = "Rana, {Md Masud} and Norela Sulaiman and Bjarne Sivertsen and Firoz Khan and Sabera Nasreen",
year = "2016",
month = "5",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1007/s11356-016-6950-4",
language = "English",
pages = "1--11",
journal = "Environmental Science and Pollution Research",
issn = "0944-1344",
publisher = "Springer Science + Business Media",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trends in atmospheric particulate matter in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and the vicinity

AU - Rana, Md Masud

AU - Sulaiman, Norela

AU - Sivertsen, Bjarne

AU - Khan, Firoz

AU - Nasreen, Sabera

PY - 2016/5/26

Y1 - 2016/5/26

N2 - Dhaka and its neighboring areas suffer from severe air pollution, especially during dry season (November–April). We investigated temporal and directional variations in particulate matter (PM) concentrations in Dhaka, Gazipur, and Narayanganj from October 2012 to March 2015 to understand different aspects of PM concentrations and possible sources of high pollution in this region. Ninety-six-hour backward trajectories for the whole dry season were also computed to investigate incursion of long-range pollution into this area. We found yearly PM10 concentrations in this area about three times and yearly PM2.5 concentrations about six times greater than the national standards of Bangladesh. Dhaka and its vicinity experienced several air pollution episodes in dry season when PM2.5 concentrations were 8–13 times greater than the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline value. Higher pollution and great contribution of PM2.5 most of the time were associated with the north-westerly wind. Winter (November to January) was found as the most polluted season in this area, when average PM10 concentrations in Dhaka, Gazipur, and Narayanganj were 257.1, 240.3, and 327.4 μg m−3, respectively. Pollution levels during wet season (May–October) were, although found legitimate as per the national standards of Bangladesh, exceeded WHO guideline value in 50 % of the days of that season. Trans-boundary source identifications using concentration-weighted trajectory method revealed that the sources in the eastern Indian region bordering Bangladesh, in the north-eastern Indian region bordering Nepal and in Nepal and its neighboring areas had high probability of contributing to the PM pollutions at Gazipur station.

AB - Dhaka and its neighboring areas suffer from severe air pollution, especially during dry season (November–April). We investigated temporal and directional variations in particulate matter (PM) concentrations in Dhaka, Gazipur, and Narayanganj from October 2012 to March 2015 to understand different aspects of PM concentrations and possible sources of high pollution in this region. Ninety-six-hour backward trajectories for the whole dry season were also computed to investigate incursion of long-range pollution into this area. We found yearly PM10 concentrations in this area about three times and yearly PM2.5 concentrations about six times greater than the national standards of Bangladesh. Dhaka and its vicinity experienced several air pollution episodes in dry season when PM2.5 concentrations were 8–13 times greater than the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline value. Higher pollution and great contribution of PM2.5 most of the time were associated with the north-westerly wind. Winter (November to January) was found as the most polluted season in this area, when average PM10 concentrations in Dhaka, Gazipur, and Narayanganj were 257.1, 240.3, and 327.4 μg m−3, respectively. Pollution levels during wet season (May–October) were, although found legitimate as per the national standards of Bangladesh, exceeded WHO guideline value in 50 % of the days of that season. Trans-boundary source identifications using concentration-weighted trajectory method revealed that the sources in the eastern Indian region bordering Bangladesh, in the north-eastern Indian region bordering Nepal and in Nepal and its neighboring areas had high probability of contributing to the PM pollutions at Gazipur station.

KW - Air quality

KW - Backward trajectory

KW - Long-range source

KW - Meteorology

KW - Particulate matter

KW - Standard

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84969917058&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84969917058&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11356-016-6950-4

DO - 10.1007/s11356-016-6950-4

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 11

JO - Environmental Science and Pollution Research

JF - Environmental Science and Pollution Research

SN - 0944-1344

ER -