Treatment Outcome Assessment of the Pharmacist-Managed Quit Smoking Clinic in Malaysia

Asrul Akmal Shafie, Mohamed Azmi Hassali, Rudy Rabi, Mei Lin Lee

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Introduction: Evaluating a new health service is different from evaluating a new drug, as the former depends on the local delivery structure and culture. No data are available on the effectiveness of the existing pharmacist-managed quit smoking clinic (PM-QSC) in Malaysia. We evaluated the effectiveness in terms of the quit and default rate, the cost per quitter, cost per patient and the number of days of the patient remained in the managed care of the pharmacist.

    Methods: The patients’ medical records at the PM-QSC in a tertiary hospital in Melaka, Malaysia, were examined retrospectively from January 2009 to December 2010. Patients were grouped into current smokers, attempted to quit and quitters. Costs were calculated per patient visit on the basis of resource used (smoking cessation agents (SCAs)) and the personnel involved (time spent by the pharmacist). This study was reviewed and approved by the Malaysia Research Ethics Committee (MREC).

    Results: The quit rate between January 2009 and December 2010 was 5.8%, and the default rate was 71.8%. The average quit period for all smokers enrolled was 298 days. From the health provider perspective, the average costs per quitter, per patient and per quit attempt were MYR 953.28 (USD 308), MYR 55.71 (USD 18) and MYR 34.74 (USD 11), respectively.

    Conclusion: The pharmacist delivery of cessation services at a public-funded QSC was associated with a high default rate. The pharmacist could not be dismissed entirely as an ineffective health care professional (HCP) for the provision of the cessation service based solely on this preliminary data, but these findings stress the need to address the high default rate prior to the expansion of the service.

    Original languageEnglish
    JournalJournal of Smoking Cessation
    DOIs
    Publication statusAccepted/In press - 5 Dec 2014

    Fingerprint

    Malaysia
    Pharmacists
    Smoking
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
    Costs and Cost Analysis
    Research Ethics Committees
    Managed Care Programs
    Smoking Cessation
    Tertiary Care Centers
    Health Services
    Medical Records
    Delivery of Health Care
    Health
    Pharmaceutical Preparations

    Keywords

    • Cost Analysis
    • Pharmacist-managed cessation clinic
    • Smoking cessation clinic
    • Smoking cessation costs

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychiatry and Mental health

    Cite this

    Treatment Outcome Assessment of the Pharmacist-Managed Quit Smoking Clinic in Malaysia. / Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Rabi, Rudy; Lee, Mei Lin.

    In: Journal of Smoking Cessation, 05.12.2014.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Shafie, Asrul Akmal ; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi ; Rabi, Rudy ; Lee, Mei Lin. / Treatment Outcome Assessment of the Pharmacist-Managed Quit Smoking Clinic in Malaysia. In: Journal of Smoking Cessation. 2014.
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