Treatment decision-making among breast cancer patients in Malaysia

Yong Hui Nies, Farida Hanim Islahudin, Wei Wen Chong, Norlia Abdullah, Fuad Ismail, Ros Suzanna Ahmad Bustamam, Yoke Fui Wong, Saladina Jaszle Jasmin, Noraida Mohamed Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated breast cancer patients’ involvement level in the treatment decision-making process and the concordance between patients’ and physician’s perspectives in decision-making. Participants and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted involving physicians and newly diagnosed breast cancer patients from three public/teaching hospitals in Malaysia. The Control Preference Scale (CPS) was administered to patients and physicians, and the Krantz Health Opinion Survey (KHOS) was completed by the patients alone. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the association between sociodemographic characteristics, the patients’ involvement in treatment decision-making, and patients’ preference for behavioral involvement and information related to their disease. Results: The majority of patients preferred to share decision-making with their physicians (47.5%), while the second largest group preferred being passive (42.6%) and a small number preferred being active (9.8%). However, the physicians perceived that the majority of patients preferred active decision-making (56.9%), followed by those who desired shared decision-making (32.8%), and those who preferred passive decision-making (10.3%). The overall concordance was 26.5% (54 of 204 patient-physician dyads). The median of preference for information score and behavioral involvement score was 4 (interquartile range [IQR] =3-5) and 2 (IQR =2-3), respectively. In univariate analysis, the ethnicity and educational qualification of patients were significantly associated with the patients’ preferred role in the process of treatment decision-making and the patients’ preference for information seeking (p,0.05). However, only educational qualification (p=0.004) was significantly associated with patients’ preference for information seeking in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Physicians failed to understand patients’ perspectives and preferences in treatment decision-making. The concordance between physicians’ perception and patients’ perception was quite low as the physicians perceived that more than half of the patients were active in treatment decision-making. In actuality, more than half of patients perceived that they shared decision-making with their physicians.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1767-1777
Number of pages11
JournalPatient Preference and Adherence
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Oct 2017

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Decision Making
cancer
physician
Breast Neoplasms
decision making
Physicians
Patient Preference
Therapeutics
Patient Participation
qualification
dyad
cross-sectional study
multivariate analysis
Public Hospitals
decision-making process
Health Surveys
Teaching Hospitals
ethnicity
logistics

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Control Preference Scale
  • Krantz Health Opinion Survey
  • Malaysia
  • Patient-physician dyad
  • Shared decision-making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Treatment decision-making among breast cancer patients in Malaysia. / Nies, Yong Hui; Islahudin, Farida Hanim; Chong, Wei Wen; Abdullah, Norlia; Ismail, Fuad; Bustamam, Ros Suzanna Ahmad; Wong, Yoke Fui; Jasmin, Saladina Jaszle; Mohamed Shah, Noraida.

In: Patient Preference and Adherence, Vol. 11, 16.10.2017, p. 1767-1777.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Chong, Wei Wen

AU - Abdullah, Norlia

AU - Ismail, Fuad

AU - Bustamam, Ros Suzanna Ahmad

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AU - Jasmin, Saladina Jaszle

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N2 - Purpose: This study investigated breast cancer patients’ involvement level in the treatment decision-making process and the concordance between patients’ and physician’s perspectives in decision-making. Participants and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted involving physicians and newly diagnosed breast cancer patients from three public/teaching hospitals in Malaysia. The Control Preference Scale (CPS) was administered to patients and physicians, and the Krantz Health Opinion Survey (KHOS) was completed by the patients alone. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the association between sociodemographic characteristics, the patients’ involvement in treatment decision-making, and patients’ preference for behavioral involvement and information related to their disease. Results: The majority of patients preferred to share decision-making with their physicians (47.5%), while the second largest group preferred being passive (42.6%) and a small number preferred being active (9.8%). However, the physicians perceived that the majority of patients preferred active decision-making (56.9%), followed by those who desired shared decision-making (32.8%), and those who preferred passive decision-making (10.3%). The overall concordance was 26.5% (54 of 204 patient-physician dyads). The median of preference for information score and behavioral involvement score was 4 (interquartile range [IQR] =3-5) and 2 (IQR =2-3), respectively. In univariate analysis, the ethnicity and educational qualification of patients were significantly associated with the patients’ preferred role in the process of treatment decision-making and the patients’ preference for information seeking (p,0.05). However, only educational qualification (p=0.004) was significantly associated with patients’ preference for information seeking in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Physicians failed to understand patients’ perspectives and preferences in treatment decision-making. The concordance between physicians’ perception and patients’ perception was quite low as the physicians perceived that more than half of the patients were active in treatment decision-making. In actuality, more than half of patients perceived that they shared decision-making with their physicians.

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KW - Control Preference Scale

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KW - Shared decision-making

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