Trans fatty acid content in Malaysian supermarket foods

A field-to-laboratory approach in assessing food risk

Tilakavati Karupaiah, Hui Kuen Tan, Wei Wen Ong, Choon Heen Tan, Kalyana Sundram

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The extent of industrial trans fatty acids (TFA) in the food supply is unknown in Malaysia, whilst TFA disclosure on food labels is not mandatory by Malaysian food standards. Supermarket foods such as dairy products, fats and oils, meat products, snack foods, soups, and confectionery are commonly cited to be major contributors of TFA in the diet. A consumer survey (n = 622) was used to develop a food listing of these 'high risk' foods. TFA content of high-risk foods were analysed by gas chromatography. Food samples (n = 158) were analysed and their total TFA content were compared with Malaysian Food Standards. A wide variation in TFA content within food categories was indicated. Of the foods containing TFA, many food labels did not cite TFA content or the use of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO) as an ingredient. Hypothesised estimates of TFA intake from these supermarket foods in a sample day's menu providing 2000 kcal projected a minimum intake of 0.5 g and a maximum intake of 5.2 g TFA. This study found there was no voluntary disclosure of TFA content on food labels or identifying PHVO as an ingredient. It appears that health education targeting consumers to minimise TFA consumption is required supported by mandatory PHVO disclosure on the food label.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1375-1384
Number of pages10
JournalFood Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Trans Fatty Acids
trans fatty acids
supermarkets
fatty acid composition
Food
food labeling
hydrogenated oils
Plant Oils
Disclosure
vegetable oil
Labels
ingredients
consumer surveys
snack foods
health education
menu planning
soups
Snacks
Dairy products
Meat Products

Keywords

  • gas chromatography
  • high-risk foods
  • labelling
  • PHVO
  • supermarket foods
  • survey
  • trans fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Toxicology
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Trans fatty acid content in Malaysian supermarket foods : A field-to-laboratory approach in assessing food risk. / Karupaiah, Tilakavati; Tan, Hui Kuen; Ong, Wei Wen; Tan, Choon Heen; Sundram, Kalyana.

In: Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment, Vol. 31, No. 8, 2014, p. 1375-1384.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{54af7165a05142a5b4cc5c68e1274eea,
title = "Trans fatty acid content in Malaysian supermarket foods: A field-to-laboratory approach in assessing food risk",
abstract = "The extent of industrial trans fatty acids (TFA) in the food supply is unknown in Malaysia, whilst TFA disclosure on food labels is not mandatory by Malaysian food standards. Supermarket foods such as dairy products, fats and oils, meat products, snack foods, soups, and confectionery are commonly cited to be major contributors of TFA in the diet. A consumer survey (n = 622) was used to develop a food listing of these 'high risk' foods. TFA content of high-risk foods were analysed by gas chromatography. Food samples (n = 158) were analysed and their total TFA content were compared with Malaysian Food Standards. A wide variation in TFA content within food categories was indicated. Of the foods containing TFA, many food labels did not cite TFA content or the use of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO) as an ingredient. Hypothesised estimates of TFA intake from these supermarket foods in a sample day's menu providing 2000 kcal projected a minimum intake of 0.5 g and a maximum intake of 5.2 g TFA. This study found there was no voluntary disclosure of TFA content on food labels or identifying PHVO as an ingredient. It appears that health education targeting consumers to minimise TFA consumption is required supported by mandatory PHVO disclosure on the food label.",
keywords = "gas chromatography, high-risk foods, labelling, PHVO, supermarket foods, survey, trans fatty acids",
author = "Tilakavati Karupaiah and Tan, {Hui Kuen} and Ong, {Wei Wen} and Tan, {Choon Heen} and Kalyana Sundram",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1080/19440049.2014.929183",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "1375--1384",
journal = "Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment",
issn = "1944-0049",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trans fatty acid content in Malaysian supermarket foods

T2 - A field-to-laboratory approach in assessing food risk

AU - Karupaiah, Tilakavati

AU - Tan, Hui Kuen

AU - Ong, Wei Wen

AU - Tan, Choon Heen

AU - Sundram, Kalyana

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - The extent of industrial trans fatty acids (TFA) in the food supply is unknown in Malaysia, whilst TFA disclosure on food labels is not mandatory by Malaysian food standards. Supermarket foods such as dairy products, fats and oils, meat products, snack foods, soups, and confectionery are commonly cited to be major contributors of TFA in the diet. A consumer survey (n = 622) was used to develop a food listing of these 'high risk' foods. TFA content of high-risk foods were analysed by gas chromatography. Food samples (n = 158) were analysed and their total TFA content were compared with Malaysian Food Standards. A wide variation in TFA content within food categories was indicated. Of the foods containing TFA, many food labels did not cite TFA content or the use of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO) as an ingredient. Hypothesised estimates of TFA intake from these supermarket foods in a sample day's menu providing 2000 kcal projected a minimum intake of 0.5 g and a maximum intake of 5.2 g TFA. This study found there was no voluntary disclosure of TFA content on food labels or identifying PHVO as an ingredient. It appears that health education targeting consumers to minimise TFA consumption is required supported by mandatory PHVO disclosure on the food label.

AB - The extent of industrial trans fatty acids (TFA) in the food supply is unknown in Malaysia, whilst TFA disclosure on food labels is not mandatory by Malaysian food standards. Supermarket foods such as dairy products, fats and oils, meat products, snack foods, soups, and confectionery are commonly cited to be major contributors of TFA in the diet. A consumer survey (n = 622) was used to develop a food listing of these 'high risk' foods. TFA content of high-risk foods were analysed by gas chromatography. Food samples (n = 158) were analysed and their total TFA content were compared with Malaysian Food Standards. A wide variation in TFA content within food categories was indicated. Of the foods containing TFA, many food labels did not cite TFA content or the use of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO) as an ingredient. Hypothesised estimates of TFA intake from these supermarket foods in a sample day's menu providing 2000 kcal projected a minimum intake of 0.5 g and a maximum intake of 5.2 g TFA. This study found there was no voluntary disclosure of TFA content on food labels or identifying PHVO as an ingredient. It appears that health education targeting consumers to minimise TFA consumption is required supported by mandatory PHVO disclosure on the food label.

KW - gas chromatography

KW - high-risk foods

KW - labelling

KW - PHVO

KW - supermarket foods

KW - survey

KW - trans fatty acids

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84904317963&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84904317963&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/19440049.2014.929183

DO - 10.1080/19440049.2014.929183

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 1375

EP - 1384

JO - Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment

JF - Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment

SN - 1944-0049

IS - 8

ER -