Training-induced increases in sea level VO(2max) and endurance are not enhanced by acute hypobaric exposure

D. L. Emonson, A. H K Aminuddin, R. L. Wight, G. C. Scroop, C. J. Gore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study used untrained subjects to examine the effect of acute hypobaric exposure during endurance training on subsequent exercise performance at sea level. Two groups, each of nine subjects, completed 5 weeks of endurance training [cycle ergometer exercise for 45 min, three times per week at a heart rate corresponding to 70% of that achieved at the maximal O2 consumption (V̇O(2max)) either at sea level or at high altitude] in a hypobaric chamber, under either normobaric [sea level, SL; 750 mmHg (100 kPa) ≃ 90 m] or hypobaric [altitude, ALT; 554 mmHg (73.4 kPa) ≃ 2500 m] conditions and the changes in SL V̇O(2max), SL endurance time and peak blood lactate during the endurance test compared. While each group showed increases in both SL V̇O(2max) (≃ 12%) and SL endurance time (≃ 71%), there were no significant differences between the groups [SL V̇O(2max), mean (SE)- SL group: pre-training = 42.4 (3.5), post-training = 46.1 (3.5) ml·kg-1·min-1, P < 0.005; ALT group: pre-training = 40.8 (2.6), post-training = 47.2 (3.4) ml· kg-1· min-1, P < 0.01; SL endurance time - SL group: pre-training 7.1 (1.5), post-training 11.8 (2.9) min, P < 0.01; ALT group: pre-training = 7.5 (0.6), post-training = 13.3 (1.4) min, P < 0.001]. Peak blood lactate during the endurance test was not altered by either training regimen. It is concluded that acute exposure of untrained subjects to hypobaric hypoxia during endurance training has no synergistic effect on the degree of improvement in either SL V̇O(2max) or endurance time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8-12
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
Volume76
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Oceans and Seas
Lactic Acid
Heart Rate

Keywords

  • Altitude training
  • Endurance
  • Maximal oxygen consumption
  • Peak lactate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Training-induced increases in sea level VO(2max) and endurance are not enhanced by acute hypobaric exposure. / Emonson, D. L.; Aminuddin, A. H K; Wight, R. L.; Scroop, G. C.; Gore, C. J.

In: European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, Vol. 76, No. 1, 1997, p. 8-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Emonson, D. L. ; Aminuddin, A. H K ; Wight, R. L. ; Scroop, G. C. ; Gore, C. J. / Training-induced increases in sea level VO(2max) and endurance are not enhanced by acute hypobaric exposure. In: European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology. 1997 ; Vol. 76, No. 1. pp. 8-12.
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