Traffic-related Air Pollution (TRAP), Air Quality Perception and Respiratory Health Symptoms of Active Commuters in a University Outdoor Environment

M. F. Zakaria, E. Ezani, N. Hassan, N. A. Ramli, Muhammad Ikram A Wahab

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Air quality plays significant role in human's health and wellbeing. Vehicle exhaust emissions may lead to health risks especially people who are actively commute. This study aims to examine the association between traffic-related air pollution, perception on traffic pollution and respiratory health symptoms among pedestrian and cyclists in a university campus located in Selangor, Malaysia. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographic, air quality perception and respiratory health symptoms among university students (N = 180). Air pollutants (PM10, PM2.5 and ozone(O3)) were measured during rush hour (morning, afternoon and evening) simultaneously with traffic count nearby campus roadsides. The average levels of PM10 (83.8 μg/m3), PM2.5 (48.9 μg/m3) and O3 (314.9 μg/m3) were higher during rush hour measurements. 51.1% participants agreed that high number of old and private vehicles were the major contributor of air pollution. There were significant associations between each level of traffic-related air pollutants and air quality perception and respiratory health symptoms (p<0.05). This study suggests preventive measures for the university management to control traffic-related air pollution in the campus areas.

Original languageEnglish
Article number012017
JournalIOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science
Volume228
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Feb 2019
Externally publishedYes
Event3rd International Conference on Science and Technology Applications in Climate Change, STACLIM 2018 - Ayer Keroh. Malacca, Malaysia
Duration: 13 Nov 201815 Nov 2018

Fingerprint

air quality
atmospheric pollution
exhaust emission
pedestrian
traffic emission
health risk
student
ozone
pollution
traffic
health
air pollutant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Traffic-related Air Pollution (TRAP), Air Quality Perception and Respiratory Health Symptoms of Active Commuters in a University Outdoor Environment. / Zakaria, M. F.; Ezani, E.; Hassan, N.; Ramli, N. A.; A Wahab, Muhammad Ikram.

In: IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science, Vol. 228, No. 1, 012017, 15.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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