Toxicological evaluation of some Malaysian locally processed raw food products

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Abstract

Malaysian locally processed raw food products are widely used as main ingredients in local cooking. Previous studies showed that these food products have a positive correlation with the incidence of cancer. The cytotoxicity effect was evaluated using MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimetil-2-thiazolil)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) against Chang liver cells at 2000 μg/ml following 72 h incubation. Findings showed all methanol extracts caused a tremendous drop in the percentage of cell viability at 2000 μg/ml (shrimp paste - 41.69 ± 3.36%, salted fish - 37.2 ± 1.06%, dried shrimp - 40.32 ± 1.8%, p < 0.05). To detect DNA damage in a single cell, alkaline Comet Assay was used. None of the extracts caused DNA damage to the Chang liver cells at 62.5 μg/ml following 24 h incubation, as compared to the positive control, hydrogen peroxide (tail moment - 9.50 ± 1.50; tail intensity - 30.50 ± 2.50). Proximate analysis which was used for the evaluation of macronutrients in food showed that shrimp paste did not comply with the protein requirement (<25%) as in Food Act 1983. Salt was found in every sample with the highest percentage being detected in shrimp paste which exceeded 20%. Following heavy metal analysis (arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury), arsenic was found in every sample with dried shrimps showing the highest value as compared to the other samples (6.16 mg/kg). In conclusion, several food extracts showed cytotoxic effect but did not cause DNA damage against Chang liver cells. Salt was found as the main additive and arsenic was present in every sample, which could be the probable cause of the toxicity effects observed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)368-374
Number of pages7
JournalFood and Chemical Toxicology
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2008

Fingerprint

raw foods
processed foods
Toxicology
foods
Arsenic
shrimp
Ointments
DNA Damage
Food
arsenic
DNA damage
Liver
hepatocytes
Tail
Salts
cytotoxicity
Assays
DNA
extracts
tail

Keywords

  • Alkaline Comet assay
  • Chang liver cells
  • Dried shrimp
  • Malaysian local raw food products
  • MTT assay
  • Salted fish
  • Shrimp paste (belacan)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Toxicology

Cite this

@article{291193404dab4364ab20eeb8c4006deb,
title = "Toxicological evaluation of some Malaysian locally processed raw food products",
abstract = "Malaysian locally processed raw food products are widely used as main ingredients in local cooking. Previous studies showed that these food products have a positive correlation with the incidence of cancer. The cytotoxicity effect was evaluated using MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimetil-2-thiazolil)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) against Chang liver cells at 2000 μg/ml following 72 h incubation. Findings showed all methanol extracts caused a tremendous drop in the percentage of cell viability at 2000 μg/ml (shrimp paste - 41.69 ± 3.36{\%}, salted fish - 37.2 ± 1.06{\%}, dried shrimp - 40.32 ± 1.8{\%}, p < 0.05). To detect DNA damage in a single cell, alkaline Comet Assay was used. None of the extracts caused DNA damage to the Chang liver cells at 62.5 μg/ml following 24 h incubation, as compared to the positive control, hydrogen peroxide (tail moment - 9.50 ± 1.50; tail intensity - 30.50 ± 2.50). Proximate analysis which was used for the evaluation of macronutrients in food showed that shrimp paste did not comply with the protein requirement (<25{\%}) as in Food Act 1983. Salt was found in every sample with the highest percentage being detected in shrimp paste which exceeded 20{\%}. Following heavy metal analysis (arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury), arsenic was found in every sample with dried shrimps showing the highest value as compared to the other samples (6.16 mg/kg). In conclusion, several food extracts showed cytotoxic effect but did not cause DNA damage against Chang liver cells. Salt was found as the main additive and arsenic was present in every sample, which could be the probable cause of the toxicity effects observed.",
keywords = "Alkaline Comet assay, Chang liver cells, Dried shrimp, Malaysian local raw food products, MTT assay, Salted fish, Shrimp paste (belacan)",
author = "{Sharif @ Mohd Sharif}, Razinah and Ghazali, {Ahmad Rohi} and Rajab, {Nor Fadilah} and Hasnah Haron and F. Osman",
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AU - Sharif @ Mohd Sharif, Razinah

AU - Ghazali, Ahmad Rohi

AU - Rajab, Nor Fadilah

AU - Haron, Hasnah

AU - Osman, F.

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AB - Malaysian locally processed raw food products are widely used as main ingredients in local cooking. Previous studies showed that these food products have a positive correlation with the incidence of cancer. The cytotoxicity effect was evaluated using MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimetil-2-thiazolil)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) against Chang liver cells at 2000 μg/ml following 72 h incubation. Findings showed all methanol extracts caused a tremendous drop in the percentage of cell viability at 2000 μg/ml (shrimp paste - 41.69 ± 3.36%, salted fish - 37.2 ± 1.06%, dried shrimp - 40.32 ± 1.8%, p < 0.05). To detect DNA damage in a single cell, alkaline Comet Assay was used. None of the extracts caused DNA damage to the Chang liver cells at 62.5 μg/ml following 24 h incubation, as compared to the positive control, hydrogen peroxide (tail moment - 9.50 ± 1.50; tail intensity - 30.50 ± 2.50). Proximate analysis which was used for the evaluation of macronutrients in food showed that shrimp paste did not comply with the protein requirement (<25%) as in Food Act 1983. Salt was found in every sample with the highest percentage being detected in shrimp paste which exceeded 20%. Following heavy metal analysis (arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury), arsenic was found in every sample with dried shrimps showing the highest value as compared to the other samples (6.16 mg/kg). In conclusion, several food extracts showed cytotoxic effect but did not cause DNA damage against Chang liver cells. Salt was found as the main additive and arsenic was present in every sample, which could be the probable cause of the toxicity effects observed.

KW - Alkaline Comet assay

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KW - Salted fish

KW - Shrimp paste (belacan)

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