Toward IPv4 to IPv6 migration within a campus network

Mohammad Mirwais Yousafzai, Nor Effendy Othman, Rosilah Hassan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The evolution of the Internet has effectively exhausted all unique addresses offered by the current IPv4 protocol. Hence, IPv6 has been developed in response to the predicted long-term demand for addresses by Internet users. This new IP version has a 128-bit address length, which is four times that of IPv4. As the two protocols have different formats and behaviors, efforts are needed to ensure they can directly communicate with each other. Some transition mechanisms have been proposed by IETF to enable IPv4 and IPv6 networks to coexist until the whole Internet is based on an IPv6 network. This paper discusses a general overview of IPv4 and IPv6 addresses, along with IPv4 to IPv6 transition techniques on a campus network. Moreover, we summarize some of the IPv6 test-bed use cases. In addition, we describe a pure IPv6 real test-bed implementation scenario and discuss test results. Finally, we propose some major preactivities for the design and implementation of an IPv6 network within a campus network.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-217
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Theoretical and Applied Information Technology
Volume77
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jul 2015

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Migration
Internet
Network protocols
Testbed
Use Case
Scenarios

Keywords

  • Campus network
  • IPv4 to IPv6 migration
  • IPv6 network setup
  • IPv6 test-bed
  • IPv6 transition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Toward IPv4 to IPv6 migration within a campus network. / Yousafzai, Mohammad Mirwais; Othman, Nor Effendy; Hassan, Rosilah.

In: Journal of Theoretical and Applied Information Technology, Vol. 77, No. 2, 20.07.2015, p. 209-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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