Total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity of beans: Organic vs inorganic

Y. Hanis Mastura, Hasnah Haron, T. N. Dang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of different cooking procedures on the total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity of organic and inorganic beans based on the increasing demand of organic food products. The total phenolic content and antioxidant capacities of eight types of beans matched to the organic and inorganic samples was analyzed based on three different conditions namely raw (R), cooked without soaking (CWS) and cooked after soaking (CAS). Changes in these variables before and after processing were compared between organic and inorganic beans. CAS caused significant (p < 0.05) losses of total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity than CWS. Although cooking caused reduction in total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity, no prevalence losses from either type of organic or inorganic bean was found. In general, black bean, red bean, green bean, red kidney bean and soybean from both organic and inorganic types of beans possessed higher total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity, whereas red dhal, yellow dhal and chickpea possessed lower levels of both parameter assessed. All antioxidant capacity assays showed positive and significant correlation (p < 0.001) with total phenolic content. This paper provides new information on effect of cooking procedures on the health relevant functionality of organic beans. Knowing that the price of organic beans can be doubled of inorganic beans, this study provides an insight on the importance to balance out the cost and benefits of organic beans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)510-517
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Food Research Journal
Volume24
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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beans
Antioxidants
antioxidants
Cooking
soaking
red beans
cooking
pigeon peas
Organic Food
Cicer
Phaseolus
Soybeans
Cost-Benefit Analysis
black beans
organic foods
kidney beans
green beans
Health
foods
soybeans

Keywords

  • Chemical composition
  • Chia
  • DPPH
  • FRAP
  • Natural antioxidant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity of beans : Organic vs inorganic. / Mastura, Y. Hanis; Haron, Hasnah; Dang, T. N.

In: International Food Research Journal, Vol. 24, No. 2, 2017, p. 510-517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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