To check or not to check? A qualitative study on how the public decides on health checks for cardiovascular disease prevention

Ai Theng Cheong, Ee Ming Khoo, Tong Seng Fah, Su May Liew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background More than half of the general population does not attend screening for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) hence they are unaware of their risks. The objective of this study was to explore the views and experiences of the public in deciding to undergo health checks for CVD prevention. Methods This was a qualitative study utilising the constructivist grounded theory approach. A total of 31 individuals aged 30 years and above from the community were sampled purposively. Eight interviews and six focus groups were involved, using a semi-structured topic guide. Results A conceptual framework was developed to explain the public's decision-making process on health check participation for CVD prevention. The intention to participate in health checks was influenced by the interplay between perceived relevance and the individual's readiness to face the outcome of health checks. Health checks were deemed relevant if people perceived themselves to be at risk of CVD and there was an advantage in knowing their cardiovascular status. People were ready to face the outcome of health checks if they wanted to know the results and were prepared to deal with the subsequent management. The decision to participate in health checks was also influenced by external factors such as the views of significant others, and the accessibility and availability of resources including time and finances The intention to screen for CVD is motivated by two internal factors: the perceived relevance of the disease and readiness to face screening outcomes. Strategies targeting the internal decision-making process may prove to be key in improving the uptake of screening.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0159438
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2016

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disease prevention
cardiovascular diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases
Health
screening
Screening
decision making
finance
Decision Making
focus groups
Decision making
interviews
Finance
Focus Groups
Availability
Interviews
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

To check or not to check? A qualitative study on how the public decides on health checks for cardiovascular disease prevention. / Cheong, Ai Theng; Khoo, Ee Ming; Seng Fah, Tong; Liew, Su May.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 7, e0159438, 01.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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