Thyroid hormones: Possible roles in epilepsy pathology

Seyedeh Masoumeh Seyedhoseini Tamijani, Benyamin Karimi, Elham Amini, Mojtaba Golpich, Leila Dargahi, Raymond Azman Ali, Norlinah Mohamed Ibrahim, Zahurin Mohamed, Rasoul Ghasemi, Abolhassan Ahmadiani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thyroid hormones (THs) l-thyroxine and l-triiodothyronine, primarily known as metabolism regulators, are tyrosine-derived hormones produced by the thyroid gland. They play an essential role in normal central nervous system development and physiological function. By binding to nuclear receptors and modulating gene expression, THs influence neuronal migration, differentiation, myelination, synaptogenesis and neurogenesis in developing and adult brains. Any uncorrected THs supply deficiency in early life may result in irreversible neurological and motor deficits. The development and function of GABAergic neurons as well as glutamatergic transmission are also affected by THs. Though the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unknown, the effects of THs on inhibitory and excitatory neurons may affect brain seizure activity. The enduring predisposition of the brain to generate epileptic seizures leads to a complex chronic brain disorder known as epilepsy. Pathologically, epilepsy may be accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and eventually dysregulation of excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission. Based on the latest evidence on the association between THs and epilepsy, we hypothesize that THs abnormalities may contribute to the pathogenesis of epilepsy. We also review gender differences and the presumed underlying mechanisms through which TH abnormalities may affect epilepsy here.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-164
Number of pages10
JournalSeizure
Volume31
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2015

Fingerprint

Thyroid Hormones
Epilepsy
Pathology
Brain
GABAergic Neurons
Neurogenesis
Brain Diseases
Triiodothyronine
Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Receptors
Thyroxine
Synaptic Transmission
Tyrosine
Thyroid Gland
Seizures
Oxidative Stress
Central Nervous System
Hormones
Gene Expression
Neurons

Keywords

  • Brain development
  • Epileptogenesis
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Seizures
  • Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Tamijani, S. M. S., Karimi, B., Amini, E., Golpich, M., Dargahi, L., Ali, R. A., ... Ahmadiani, A. (2015). Thyroid hormones: Possible roles in epilepsy pathology. Seizure, 31, 155-164. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2015.07.021

Thyroid hormones : Possible roles in epilepsy pathology. / Tamijani, Seyedeh Masoumeh Seyedhoseini; Karimi, Benyamin; Amini, Elham; Golpich, Mojtaba; Dargahi, Leila; Ali, Raymond Azman; Mohamed Ibrahim, Norlinah; Mohamed, Zahurin; Ghasemi, Rasoul; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan.

In: Seizure, Vol. 31, 01.09.2015, p. 155-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tamijani, SMS, Karimi, B, Amini, E, Golpich, M, Dargahi, L, Ali, RA, Mohamed Ibrahim, N, Mohamed, Z, Ghasemi, R & Ahmadiani, A 2015, 'Thyroid hormones: Possible roles in epilepsy pathology', Seizure, vol. 31, pp. 155-164. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2015.07.021
Tamijani SMS, Karimi B, Amini E, Golpich M, Dargahi L, Ali RA et al. Thyroid hormones: Possible roles in epilepsy pathology. Seizure. 2015 Sep 1;31:155-164. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2015.07.021
Tamijani, Seyedeh Masoumeh Seyedhoseini ; Karimi, Benyamin ; Amini, Elham ; Golpich, Mojtaba ; Dargahi, Leila ; Ali, Raymond Azman ; Mohamed Ibrahim, Norlinah ; Mohamed, Zahurin ; Ghasemi, Rasoul ; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan. / Thyroid hormones : Possible roles in epilepsy pathology. In: Seizure. 2015 ; Vol. 31. pp. 155-164.
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