Thin strut bare metal stents in patients with atrial fibrillation: Is there still a need for BMS?

Matthias Leschke, Matthias Waliszewski, Maxime Pons, Stanislas Champin, Lyassine Nait Saidi, Tay Mok Heang, Oteh Maskon, Wan Azman Bin Wan Ahmad, Denny Herberger, Marc Eric Moulichon, Jérôme Rischner, Christophe Robin, Florence Leclercq, Jean Pascal Peyre, Benjamin Faurie, André Schneider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This observational study assessed the 9-month clinical outcomes in an « all comers » population with a focus on patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) after thin strut bare metal stenting. Background: Drug eluting stent (DES) implantation is the treatment of choice for coronary artery disease (CAD) leaving only marginal indications for the use of bare metal stents (BMS). However, selected treatment populations with DES contraindications such as patients who cannot sustain 6–12 months of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) remain candidates for BMS implantations. Methods: Thin strut bare metal stenting in a priori defined subgroups were investigated in a non-randomized, international, multicenter «all comers» observational study. Primary endpoint was the 9-month TLR rate whereas secondary endpoints included the 9-month MACE and procedural success rates. Results: A total of 783 patients of whom 98 patients had AF underwent BMS implantation. Patient age was 70.4 ± 12.8 years. Cardiovascular risk factors in the overall population were male gender (78.2%, 612/783), diabetes (25.2%, 197/783), hypertension (64.1%, 502/783), cardiogenic shock (4.9%, 38/783) and end stage renal disease (4.9%, 38/783). In-hospital MACE was 4.1% (30/783) in the overall population. The 9-month TLR rate was 4.5% (29/645) in the non-AF group and 3.3% (3/90) in the AF group (P = 0.613). At 9 months, the MACE rate in the AF-group and non-AF group was not significantly different either (10.7%, 69/645 vs. 6.7%, 6/90; P = 0.237). Accumulated stroke rates were 0.3% (2/645) in the non-AF subgroup at baseline and 1.1% (1/90) in the AF subgroup (P = 0.264). Conclusion: Bare metal stenting in AF patients delivered acceptably low TLR and MACE rates while having the benefit of a significantly shorter DAPT duration in a DES dominated clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)358-366
Number of pages9
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume88
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Atrial Fibrillation
Stents
Metals
Drug-Eluting Stents
Population
Observational Studies
Cardiogenic Shock
Therapeutics
Chronic Kidney Failure
Coronary Artery Disease
Stroke
Hypertension

Keywords

  • all comers observational study
  • atrial fibrillation
  • bare metal stent
  • MACE
  • TLR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Leschke, M., Waliszewski, M., Pons, M., Champin, S., Nait Saidi, L., Mok Heang, T., ... Schneider, A. (2016). Thin strut bare metal stents in patients with atrial fibrillation: Is there still a need for BMS? Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, 88(3), 358-366. https://doi.org/10.1002/ccd.26261

Thin strut bare metal stents in patients with atrial fibrillation : Is there still a need for BMS? / Leschke, Matthias; Waliszewski, Matthias; Pons, Maxime; Champin, Stanislas; Nait Saidi, Lyassine; Mok Heang, Tay; Maskon, Oteh; Azman Bin Wan Ahmad, Wan; Herberger, Denny; Moulichon, Marc Eric; Rischner, Jérôme; Robin, Christophe; Leclercq, Florence; Peyre, Jean Pascal; Faurie, Benjamin; Schneider, André.

In: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, Vol. 88, No. 3, 01.09.2016, p. 358-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leschke, M, Waliszewski, M, Pons, M, Champin, S, Nait Saidi, L, Mok Heang, T, Maskon, O, Azman Bin Wan Ahmad, W, Herberger, D, Moulichon, ME, Rischner, J, Robin, C, Leclercq, F, Peyre, JP, Faurie, B & Schneider, A 2016, 'Thin strut bare metal stents in patients with atrial fibrillation: Is there still a need for BMS?', Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, vol. 88, no. 3, pp. 358-366. https://doi.org/10.1002/ccd.26261
Leschke, Matthias ; Waliszewski, Matthias ; Pons, Maxime ; Champin, Stanislas ; Nait Saidi, Lyassine ; Mok Heang, Tay ; Maskon, Oteh ; Azman Bin Wan Ahmad, Wan ; Herberger, Denny ; Moulichon, Marc Eric ; Rischner, Jérôme ; Robin, Christophe ; Leclercq, Florence ; Peyre, Jean Pascal ; Faurie, Benjamin ; Schneider, André. / Thin strut bare metal stents in patients with atrial fibrillation : Is there still a need for BMS?. In: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions. 2016 ; Vol. 88, No. 3. pp. 358-366.
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abstract = "Objectives: This observational study assessed the 9-month clinical outcomes in an « all comers » population with a focus on patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) after thin strut bare metal stenting. Background: Drug eluting stent (DES) implantation is the treatment of choice for coronary artery disease (CAD) leaving only marginal indications for the use of bare metal stents (BMS). However, selected treatment populations with DES contraindications such as patients who cannot sustain 6–12 months of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) remain candidates for BMS implantations. Methods: Thin strut bare metal stenting in a priori defined subgroups were investigated in a non-randomized, international, multicenter «all comers» observational study. Primary endpoint was the 9-month TLR rate whereas secondary endpoints included the 9-month MACE and procedural success rates. Results: A total of 783 patients of whom 98 patients had AF underwent BMS implantation. Patient age was 70.4 ± 12.8 years. Cardiovascular risk factors in the overall population were male gender (78.2{\%}, 612/783), diabetes (25.2{\%}, 197/783), hypertension (64.1{\%}, 502/783), cardiogenic shock (4.9{\%}, 38/783) and end stage renal disease (4.9{\%}, 38/783). In-hospital MACE was 4.1{\%} (30/783) in the overall population. The 9-month TLR rate was 4.5{\%} (29/645) in the non-AF group and 3.3{\%} (3/90) in the AF group (P = 0.613). At 9 months, the MACE rate in the AF-group and non-AF group was not significantly different either (10.7{\%}, 69/645 vs. 6.7{\%}, 6/90; P = 0.237). Accumulated stroke rates were 0.3{\%} (2/645) in the non-AF subgroup at baseline and 1.1{\%} (1/90) in the AF subgroup (P = 0.264). Conclusion: Bare metal stenting in AF patients delivered acceptably low TLR and MACE rates while having the benefit of a significantly shorter DAPT duration in a DES dominated clinical practice.",
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T2 - Is there still a need for BMS?

AU - Leschke, Matthias

AU - Waliszewski, Matthias

AU - Pons, Maxime

AU - Champin, Stanislas

AU - Nait Saidi, Lyassine

AU - Mok Heang, Tay

AU - Maskon, Oteh

AU - Azman Bin Wan Ahmad, Wan

AU - Herberger, Denny

AU - Moulichon, Marc Eric

AU - Rischner, Jérôme

AU - Robin, Christophe

AU - Leclercq, Florence

AU - Peyre, Jean Pascal

AU - Faurie, Benjamin

AU - Schneider, André

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N2 - Objectives: This observational study assessed the 9-month clinical outcomes in an « all comers » population with a focus on patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) after thin strut bare metal stenting. Background: Drug eluting stent (DES) implantation is the treatment of choice for coronary artery disease (CAD) leaving only marginal indications for the use of bare metal stents (BMS). However, selected treatment populations with DES contraindications such as patients who cannot sustain 6–12 months of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) remain candidates for BMS implantations. Methods: Thin strut bare metal stenting in a priori defined subgroups were investigated in a non-randomized, international, multicenter «all comers» observational study. Primary endpoint was the 9-month TLR rate whereas secondary endpoints included the 9-month MACE and procedural success rates. Results: A total of 783 patients of whom 98 patients had AF underwent BMS implantation. Patient age was 70.4 ± 12.8 years. Cardiovascular risk factors in the overall population were male gender (78.2%, 612/783), diabetes (25.2%, 197/783), hypertension (64.1%, 502/783), cardiogenic shock (4.9%, 38/783) and end stage renal disease (4.9%, 38/783). In-hospital MACE was 4.1% (30/783) in the overall population. The 9-month TLR rate was 4.5% (29/645) in the non-AF group and 3.3% (3/90) in the AF group (P = 0.613). At 9 months, the MACE rate in the AF-group and non-AF group was not significantly different either (10.7%, 69/645 vs. 6.7%, 6/90; P = 0.237). Accumulated stroke rates were 0.3% (2/645) in the non-AF subgroup at baseline and 1.1% (1/90) in the AF subgroup (P = 0.264). Conclusion: Bare metal stenting in AF patients delivered acceptably low TLR and MACE rates while having the benefit of a significantly shorter DAPT duration in a DES dominated clinical practice.

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