The violation of word minimality: Evidence from Malay personal names truncation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It has long been claimed in previous studies that Malay is a disyllabic language, i.e. words in Malay must have at least two syllables. This paper however disputes the claim since there are words in the language that do not meet the minimum size of words requirement. Focusing on the truncation of personal names in Malay, this paper shows that the word minimality of the language is violated by monosyllabic truncation, also one of the patterns, as well by disyllabic truncation. Given the insight of the Morpheme-Based Template (MBT), truncation in Malay should satisfy the constraint called BASE ≠ TRUNC, which requires that truncated forms not be identical with the bases. As this constraint is ranked high, then monosyllabic truncations emerge, particularly when the Bases are disyllabic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)88-95
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Language and Literature
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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language
evidence
Violations
Personal Names
Minimality
Language
Template
Morpheme
Dispute

Keywords

  • Malay
  • Optimality theory
  • Prosodic morphology
  • Truncation
  • Word minimality condition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

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title = "The violation of word minimality: Evidence from Malay personal names truncation",
abstract = "It has long been claimed in previous studies that Malay is a disyllabic language, i.e. words in Malay must have at least two syllables. This paper however disputes the claim since there are words in the language that do not meet the minimum size of words requirement. Focusing on the truncation of personal names in Malay, this paper shows that the word minimality of the language is violated by monosyllabic truncation, also one of the patterns, as well by disyllabic truncation. Given the insight of the Morpheme-Based Template (MBT), truncation in Malay should satisfy the constraint called BASE ≠ TRUNC, which requires that truncated forms not be identical with the bases. As this constraint is ranked high, then monosyllabic truncations emerge, particularly when the Bases are disyllabic.",
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AB - It has long been claimed in previous studies that Malay is a disyllabic language, i.e. words in Malay must have at least two syllables. This paper however disputes the claim since there are words in the language that do not meet the minimum size of words requirement. Focusing on the truncation of personal names in Malay, this paper shows that the word minimality of the language is violated by monosyllabic truncation, also one of the patterns, as well by disyllabic truncation. Given the insight of the Morpheme-Based Template (MBT), truncation in Malay should satisfy the constraint called BASE ≠ TRUNC, which requires that truncated forms not be identical with the bases. As this constraint is ranked high, then monosyllabic truncations emerge, particularly when the Bases are disyllabic.

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