The use of X-shaped cross-link in posterior spinal constructs improves stability in thoracolumbar burst fracture: A finite element analysis

Mina Alizadeh, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul Kadir, Miskon Mohd Fadhli, Ali Fallahiarezoodar, Azmi Baharudin, Malliga Raman Murali, Tunku Kamarul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Posterior instrumentation is a common fixation method used to treat thoracolumbar burst fractures. However, the role of different cross-link configurations in improving fixation stability in these fractures has not been established. A 3D finite element model of T11-L3 was used to investigate the biomechanical behavior of short (2 level) and long (4 level) segmental spine pedicle screw fixation with various cross-links to treat a hypothetical L1 vertebra burst fracture. Three types of cross-link configurations with an applied moment of 7.5 Nm and 200 N axial force were evaluated. The long construct was stiffer than the short construct irrespective of whether the cross-links were used (p < 0.05). The short constructs showed no significant differences between the cross-link configurations. The XL cross-link provided the highest stiffness and was 14.9% stiffer than the one without a cross-link. The long construct resulted in reduced stress to the adjacent vertebral bodies and screw necks, with 66.7% reduction in bending stress on L2 when the XL cross-link was used. Thus, the stability for L1 burst fracture fixation was best achieved by using long segmental posterior instrumentation constructs and an XL cross-link configuration. Cross-links did not improved stability when a short structure was used. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 31:1447-1454, 2013

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1447-1454
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Research
Volume31
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

Finite Element Analysis
Spine
Fracture Fixation
Neck
Pedicle Screws

Keywords

  • biomechanics
  • burst fracture
  • finite element analysis
  • orthopedic
  • pedicle screw instrumentation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

The use of X-shaped cross-link in posterior spinal constructs improves stability in thoracolumbar burst fracture : A finite element analysis. / Alizadeh, Mina; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul; Fadhli, Miskon Mohd; Fallahiarezoodar, Ali; Baharudin, Azmi; Murali, Malliga Raman; Kamarul, Tunku.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, Vol. 31, No. 9, 09.2013, p. 1447-1454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alizadeh, Mina ; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul ; Fadhli, Miskon Mohd ; Fallahiarezoodar, Ali ; Baharudin, Azmi ; Murali, Malliga Raman ; Kamarul, Tunku. / The use of X-shaped cross-link in posterior spinal constructs improves stability in thoracolumbar burst fracture : A finite element analysis. In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2013 ; Vol. 31, No. 9. pp. 1447-1454.
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