The use of okay, right and yeah in academic lectures by native speaker lecturers

Their 'anticipated' and 'real' meanings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article demonstrates the 'patterning' of the ways discourse markers such as okay, right and yeah are used in academic lectures by native speaker lecturers. It presents an analysis of a) what the lecturers thought they would say and b) what they actually say in comparison to what the lecturers actually do say. In other words, it focuses on the differences between expectations of what would be said and speech, that is, what is actually said.The data comprise verbatim lecture transcriptions of four native speaker lecturers of different disciplines, analysed using a discourse analytical approach. The findings and discussions exhibit the reasons for the differences between the 'anticipated' and 'real' meanings of the use of these discourse markers.They also reflect upon the significance of non-verbal features in determining the actual functions of these markers. In short, this article highlights the reality use of okay, right and yeah as interactive conversational markers in academic lectures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)665-681
Number of pages17
JournalDiscourse Studies
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Transcription
Population Groups
university teacher
discourse
Yeah
Academic Lectures
Native Speaker
Lecturers
Discourse Markers

Keywords

  • academic lectures
  • discourse analysis
  • discourse markers
  • interactive markers
  • lecturers' perceptions
  • meanings
  • native speaker
  • uses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Social Psychology
  • Anthropology
  • Communication

Cite this

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