The syntactic structure of a noun phrase

Austroasiatic vs. Austronesia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The indigenous people of Malaysia consist of 18 ethnics who have their own languages. These people can be classified into three main categories, namely; Negrito, Melayo Proto, and Senoi. Each of these categories can be further sub-divided into different groups. For example, Negrito consists of six races, which are Kensiu, Kintak, Lanoh, Jahai, Mendriq, dan Bateq. Each of these races has its own language which is named after the respective race. The indigenous languages are of the Austroasiatic stocks. In Malaysia, however, the Malay language, which is one of the Austronesian stocks the national language of Malaysia. The status of the Malay language being in a different stock lays a large implication on the native children who are trying to learn and acquire the language. Due to this, it is vital for us to be aware of the differences of word order between the two stocks, especially at the phrasal and sentential levels. This article discusses and analyzes the differences between the Malay and Kensiu noun phrases. The analysis on the noun phrase of these languages revealed that there are differences in the words that precede the head noun and the words that follow the head noun in the noun phrase of the Kensiu and Malay languages. Surprisingly, some of the word orders in the noun phrases in the Kensiu language are similar to the word order in the noun phrases of the Malay language although they are from different stocks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-271
Number of pages9
JournalPertanika Journal of Social Science and Humanities
Volume19
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

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Syntactics
Language
language
Malaysia
Noun Phrase
Syntactic Structure
Head
indigenous peoples
Population Groups

Keywords

  • Austroasiatic
  • Austronesian
  • Indigenous
  • Kensiu language
  • Malay language
  • Noun phrase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Computer Science(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "The indigenous people of Malaysia consist of 18 ethnics who have their own languages. These people can be classified into three main categories, namely; Negrito, Melayo Proto, and Senoi. Each of these categories can be further sub-divided into different groups. For example, Negrito consists of six races, which are Kensiu, Kintak, Lanoh, Jahai, Mendriq, dan Bateq. Each of these races has its own language which is named after the respective race. The indigenous languages are of the Austroasiatic stocks. In Malaysia, however, the Malay language, which is one of the Austronesian stocks the national language of Malaysia. The status of the Malay language being in a different stock lays a large implication on the native children who are trying to learn and acquire the language. Due to this, it is vital for us to be aware of the differences of word order between the two stocks, especially at the phrasal and sentential levels. This article discusses and analyzes the differences between the Malay and Kensiu noun phrases. The analysis on the noun phrase of these languages revealed that there are differences in the words that precede the head noun and the words that follow the head noun in the noun phrase of the Kensiu and Malay languages. Surprisingly, some of the word orders in the noun phrases in the Kensiu language are similar to the word order in the noun phrases of the Malay language although they are from different stocks.",
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