The survival of Malaysia's national television within a changing mediascape

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

National television is the term used to describe television broadcasting owned and maintained for the public by the national government, and usually aimed at educational, informational and cultural programming. By this definition, Radio Televisyen Malaysia's TV1 is the national television in Malaysia and until 1984 was the only television broadcast offered to Malaysians. With the privatization policy, new and private stations were established, and RTM eventually faced competition. The advent of direct satellite broadcasting saw another development in the country-the establishment of Astro in 1998. The direct-to-user satellite broadcaster currently carries over 100 channels, including 8 HD channels, thus creating many more choices for viewers. More importantly, Astro carries the global media directly into our homes. International offerings such as CNN, BBC, CCTV, HBO, MTV, FOX, ESPN, Star Sports, and Star World are now within the push of a button for most Malaysians. Astro is a success story, but there were also a few failed attempts along the way such as MetroVision, MegaTV and MiTV. Currently there are new channels such as Unifi television and also Al-Hijrah TV battling for a share of the market. Aside from these, there are also web television stations such as tonton.com.my which is owned by Media Prima, KRU TV and others. This article discusses the survival of TV1 vis-à-vis television broadcasting developments in Malaysia, public perceptions on the station, and other new challenges.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2
JournalInnovation Journal
Volume16
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Malaysia
television
broadcasting
broadcaster
television broadcast
CNN
BBC
privatization
radio
Sports
programming
market

Keywords

  • Broadcasting
  • Government monopoly
  • Narrowcasting
  • National television
  • New technology
  • Niche programming
  • Privatization policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Administration

Cite this

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title = "The survival of Malaysia's national television within a changing mediascape",
abstract = "National television is the term used to describe television broadcasting owned and maintained for the public by the national government, and usually aimed at educational, informational and cultural programming. By this definition, Radio Televisyen Malaysia's TV1 is the national television in Malaysia and until 1984 was the only television broadcast offered to Malaysians. With the privatization policy, new and private stations were established, and RTM eventually faced competition. The advent of direct satellite broadcasting saw another development in the country-the establishment of Astro in 1998. The direct-to-user satellite broadcaster currently carries over 100 channels, including 8 HD channels, thus creating many more choices for viewers. More importantly, Astro carries the global media directly into our homes. International offerings such as CNN, BBC, CCTV, HBO, MTV, FOX, ESPN, Star Sports, and Star World are now within the push of a button for most Malaysians. Astro is a success story, but there were also a few failed attempts along the way such as MetroVision, MegaTV and MiTV. Currently there are new channels such as Unifi television and also Al-Hijrah TV battling for a share of the market. Aside from these, there are also web television stations such as tonton.com.my which is owned by Media Prima, KRU TV and others. This article discusses the survival of TV1 vis-{\`a}-vis television broadcasting developments in Malaysia, public perceptions on the station, and other new challenges.",
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