The South China Sea and energy security

Malaysia's reaction to emerging geopolitical reconfigurations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this article is to assess Malaysia's approach to the presence of the U.S., and China in the South China Sea. Malaysia's strategy is directed at avoiding being entwined in big power rivalry. However, reality dictates that regional powers, such as Malaysia, have to carefully strategize their links with larger powers in order to secure their rights over the natural resources that are available there, as well as to prevent the militarization of energy security. The hypothesis of this article is that the re-orientation of the re-militarization of energy security in the South China Sea has changed the geopolitical motives of the players, mainly the U.S., and China, to a neoclassical realist forward approach. We conclude that Malaysia's "hedging" role in the South China Sea is motivated by the potential conflict for hegemony and energy security between the U.S. and China.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-52
Number of pages20
JournalAfrican and Asian Studies
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Malaysia
energy
China
militarization
hegemony
natural resource
conflict potential
sea
Energy Security
South China
natural resources
Militarization
conflict
rights

Keywords

  • Energy security
  • Geopolitical reconfigurations
  • Hedging
  • Neoclassical realism
  • South China Sea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Development

Cite this

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