The role of tocotrienol in protecting against metabolic diseases

Kok Lun Pang, Chin Kok Yong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes, and these two metabolic conditions cause significant healthcare burden worldwide. Chronic inflammation and increased oxidative stress due to exposure of cells to excess nutrients in obesity may trigger insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Tocotrienol, as a functional food component with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and cell signaling-mediating effects, may be a potential agent to complement the current management of obesity and diabetes. The review aimed to summarize the current evidence on the anti-obesity and antidiabetic effects of tocotrienol. Previous studies showed that tocotrienol could suppress adipogenesis and, subsequently, reduce body weight and fat mass in animals. This was achieved by regulating pathways of lipid metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis. It could also reduce the expression of transcription factors regulating adipogenesis and increase apoptosis of adipocytes. In diabetic models, tocotrienol was shown to improve glucose homeostasis. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors was suggested to be responsible for these effects. Tocotrienol also prevented multiple systemic complications due to obesity and diabetes in animal models through suppression of inflammation and oxidative stress. Several clinical trials have been conducted to validate the antidiabetic of tocotrienol, but the results were heterogeneous. There is no evidence showing the anti-obesity effects of tocotrienol in humans. Considering the limitations of the current studies, tocotrienol has the potential to be a functional food component to aid in the management of patients with obesity and diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number923
JournalMolecules
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

metabolic diseases
obesity
Tocotrienols
Metabolic Diseases
Obesity
Medical problems
Adipogenesis
Functional Food
Oxidative stress
food
Hypoglycemic Agents
lipid metabolism
cells
Animals
Oxidative Stress
weight (mass)
homeostasis
body weight
insulin
animal models

Keywords

  • Adipose
  • Diabetes
  • Insulin resistance
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Obesity
  • Overweight
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Chemistry (miscellaneous)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Drug Discovery
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

The role of tocotrienol in protecting against metabolic diseases. / Pang, Kok Lun; Kok Yong, Chin.

In: Molecules, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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