The Relationship between Follicle-stimulating Hormone and Bone Health

Alternative Explanation for Bone Loss beyond Oestrogen?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Bone loss in women commences before the onset of menopause and oestrogen deficiency. The increase of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) precedes oestrogen decline and may be a cause for bone loss before menopause. This review summarizes the current evidence on the relationship between FSH and bone derived from cellular, animal and human studies. Cellular studies found that FSH receptor (FSHR) was present on osteoclasts, osteoclast precursors and mesenchymal stem cells but not osteoblasts. FSH promoted osteoclast differentiation, activity and survival but exerted negligible effects on osteoblasts. Transgenic FSHR or FSH knockout rodents showed heterogenous skeletal phenotypes. Supplementation of FSH enhanced bone deterioration and blocking of FSH action protected bone of rodents. Human epidemiological studies revealed a negative relationship between FSH and bone health in perimenopausal women and elderly men but the association was attenuated in postmenopausal women. In conclusion, FSH may have a direct action on bone health independent of oestrogen by enhancing bone resorption. Its effects may be attenuated in the presence of overt sex hormone deficiency. More longitudinal studies pertaining to the effects of FSH on bone health, especially on fracture risk, should be conducted to validate this speculation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1373-1383
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Medical Sciences
Volume15
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Follicle Stimulating Hormone
Estrogens
Bone and Bones
Health
Osteoclasts
FSH Receptors
Menopause
Osteoblasts
Rodentia
Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Bone Resorption
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Longitudinal Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Phenotype
Survival

Keywords

  • follicotropin
  • gonadotropins
  • menopause
  • osteopenia
  • osteoporosis
  • skeleton.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "The Relationship between Follicle-stimulating Hormone and Bone Health: Alternative Explanation for Bone Loss beyond Oestrogen?",
abstract = "Bone loss in women commences before the onset of menopause and oestrogen deficiency. The increase of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) precedes oestrogen decline and may be a cause for bone loss before menopause. This review summarizes the current evidence on the relationship between FSH and bone derived from cellular, animal and human studies. Cellular studies found that FSH receptor (FSHR) was present on osteoclasts, osteoclast precursors and mesenchymal stem cells but not osteoblasts. FSH promoted osteoclast differentiation, activity and survival but exerted negligible effects on osteoblasts. Transgenic FSHR or FSH knockout rodents showed heterogenous skeletal phenotypes. Supplementation of FSH enhanced bone deterioration and blocking of FSH action protected bone of rodents. Human epidemiological studies revealed a negative relationship between FSH and bone health in perimenopausal women and elderly men but the association was attenuated in postmenopausal women. In conclusion, FSH may have a direct action on bone health independent of oestrogen by enhancing bone resorption. Its effects may be attenuated in the presence of overt sex hormone deficiency. More longitudinal studies pertaining to the effects of FSH on bone health, especially on fracture risk, should be conducted to validate this speculation.",
keywords = "follicotropin, gonadotropins, menopause, osteopenia, osteoporosis, skeleton.",
author = "{Kok Yong}, Chin",
year = "2018",
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AU - Kok Yong, Chin

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N2 - Bone loss in women commences before the onset of menopause and oestrogen deficiency. The increase of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) precedes oestrogen decline and may be a cause for bone loss before menopause. This review summarizes the current evidence on the relationship between FSH and bone derived from cellular, animal and human studies. Cellular studies found that FSH receptor (FSHR) was present on osteoclasts, osteoclast precursors and mesenchymal stem cells but not osteoblasts. FSH promoted osteoclast differentiation, activity and survival but exerted negligible effects on osteoblasts. Transgenic FSHR or FSH knockout rodents showed heterogenous skeletal phenotypes. Supplementation of FSH enhanced bone deterioration and blocking of FSH action protected bone of rodents. Human epidemiological studies revealed a negative relationship between FSH and bone health in perimenopausal women and elderly men but the association was attenuated in postmenopausal women. In conclusion, FSH may have a direct action on bone health independent of oestrogen by enhancing bone resorption. Its effects may be attenuated in the presence of overt sex hormone deficiency. More longitudinal studies pertaining to the effects of FSH on bone health, especially on fracture risk, should be conducted to validate this speculation.

AB - Bone loss in women commences before the onset of menopause and oestrogen deficiency. The increase of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) precedes oestrogen decline and may be a cause for bone loss before menopause. This review summarizes the current evidence on the relationship between FSH and bone derived from cellular, animal and human studies. Cellular studies found that FSH receptor (FSHR) was present on osteoclasts, osteoclast precursors and mesenchymal stem cells but not osteoblasts. FSH promoted osteoclast differentiation, activity and survival but exerted negligible effects on osteoblasts. Transgenic FSHR or FSH knockout rodents showed heterogenous skeletal phenotypes. Supplementation of FSH enhanced bone deterioration and blocking of FSH action protected bone of rodents. Human epidemiological studies revealed a negative relationship between FSH and bone health in perimenopausal women and elderly men but the association was attenuated in postmenopausal women. In conclusion, FSH may have a direct action on bone health independent of oestrogen by enhancing bone resorption. Its effects may be attenuated in the presence of overt sex hormone deficiency. More longitudinal studies pertaining to the effects of FSH on bone health, especially on fracture risk, should be conducted to validate this speculation.

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