The relationship between circulating testosterone and inflammatory cytokines in men

Nur Vaizura Mohamad, Sok Kuan Wong, Wan Nuraini Wan Hasan, James Jam Jolly, Mohd Fozi Nur-Farhana, Ima Nirwana Soelaiman, Chin Kok Yong

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Testosterone is the predominant gonadal androgen in men. Low testosterone levels are found to be associated with an increased in metabolic risk and systematic inflammation. Since adipose tissue is a source of inflammatory cytokines, testosterone may regulate inflammation by acting on adipose tissue. This review aimed to explore the role of testosterone in inflammation and its mechanism of action. Both animal studies and human studies showed that (1) testosterone deficiency was associated with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines; (2) testosterone substitution reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines. The suppression of inflammation by testosterone were observed in patients with coronary artery disease, prostate cancer and diabetes mellitus through the increase in anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) and the decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α). Despite these, some studies also reported a non-significant relationship. In conclusion, testosterone may possess anti-inflammatory properties but its magnitude is debatable. More evidence is needed to validate the use of testosterone as a marker and in the management of chronic inflammatory diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-140
Number of pages12
JournalAging Male
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Testosterone
Cytokines
Inflammation
Adipose Tissue
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Interleukin-1
Interleukin-10
Androgens
Coronary Artery Disease
Interleukin-6
Prostatic Neoplasms
Diabetes Mellitus
Chronic Disease

Keywords

  • Androgen
  • inflammation
  • inflammatory markers
  • interleukins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

The relationship between circulating testosterone and inflammatory cytokines in men. / Mohamad, Nur Vaizura; Wong, Sok Kuan; Wan Hasan, Wan Nuraini; Jolly, James Jam; Nur-Farhana, Mohd Fozi; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Kok Yong, Chin.

In: Aging Male, Vol. 22, No. 2, 03.04.2019, p. 129-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Mohamad, Nur Vaizura ; Wong, Sok Kuan ; Wan Hasan, Wan Nuraini ; Jolly, James Jam ; Nur-Farhana, Mohd Fozi ; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana ; Kok Yong, Chin. / The relationship between circulating testosterone and inflammatory cytokines in men. In: Aging Male. 2019 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 129-140.
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