The molecular mechanism of Vitamin E as a bone-protecting agent: A review on current evidence

Sok Kuan Wong, Nur Vaizura Mohamad, Nurul ‘Izzah Ibrahim, Chin Kok Yong, Ahmad Nazrun Shuid, Ima Nirwana Soelaiman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Bone remodelling is a tightly-coordinated and lifelong process of replacing old damaged bone with newly-synthesized healthy bone. In the bone remodelling cycle, bone resorption is coupled with bone formation to maintain the bone volume and microarchitecture. This process is a result of communication between bone cells (osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes) with paracrine and endocrine regulators, such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species, growth factors, and hormones. The essential signalling pathways responsible for osteoclastic bone resorption and osteoblastic bone formation include the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK)/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG), Wnt/β-catenin, and oxidative stress signalling. The imbalance between bone formation and degradation, in favour of resorption, leads to the occurrence of osteoporosis. Intriguingly, vitamin E has been extensively reported for its anti-osteoporotic properties using various male and female animal models. Thus, understanding the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms contributing to the skeletal action of vitamin E is vital to promote its use as a potential bone-protecting agent. This review aims to summarize the current evidence elucidating the molecular actions of vitamin E in regulating the bone remodelling cycle.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1453
JournalInternational journal of molecular sciences
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Mar 2019

Fingerprint

tocopherol
Vitamins
Vitamin E
bones
Bone
Bone Remodeling
Bone and Bones
Osteogenesis
Bone Resorption
osteogenesis
Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-kappa B
RANK Ligand
Osteoprotegerin
Osteocytes
Catenins
kappa Opioid Receptor
Osteoclasts
Osteoblasts
Growth Hormone
Osteoporosis

Keywords

  • Inflammation
  • Osteoblast
  • Osteoclast
  • Oxidative stress
  • Tocopherol
  • Tocotrienol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

Cite this

The molecular mechanism of Vitamin E as a bone-protecting agent : A review on current evidence. / Wong, Sok Kuan; Mohamad, Nur Vaizura; Ibrahim, Nurul ‘Izzah; Kok Yong, Chin; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana.

In: International journal of molecular sciences, Vol. 20, No. 6, 1453, 02.03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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