The influence of taste on swallowing apnea, oral preparation time, and duration and amplitude of submental muscle contraction

L. P. Leow, Maggie Lee Huckabee, Shobha Sharma, T. P. Tooley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prior research has documented a modulating effect of taste on swallowing. We hypothesized that presentation of tastant stimuli would be a significant variable in swallowing-respiratory coordination, duration of oral bolus preparation, and submental muscle contraction. Twenty-three healthy females were presented with 1-cm3 gelatin samples flavored with 4 tastants of increasing intensities. Visual analogue scale ratings of perceived intensity of each were used to identify relative equivalent concentrations across the 4 tastants. Data were then collected during ingestion of 5 trials of the 4 equivalent tastants using measurements of nasal airflow and submental surface electromyography (sEMG) to record biomechanical measures. Chi-square analysis failed to identify a statistically significant influence of taste on the phase location of swallowing apnea. Repeated measures analysis of variance demonstrated significant taste effects for oral preparation time, submental sEMG amplitude, and duration (P < 0.02). Sweet tastants were prepared for a shorter time when compared with bitter tastants. Swallow duration for sour, salty, and bitter tastants were longer than sweet and neutral tastants. Sour tastants resulted in the greatest amplitude of submental muscle contraction during swallowing. This study supports existing research that found that sour substances were swallowed with more effort when compared with other tastes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-128
Number of pages10
JournalChemical Senses
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2007

Fingerprint

apnea
muscle contraction
Apnea
Deglutition
Muscle Contraction
mouth
electromyography
duration
Electromyography
rating scales
research support
gelatin
air flow
Gelatin
Visual Analog Scale
Nose
Research
analysis of variance
ingestion
Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • Bitter
  • Deglutition
  • Salty
  • Sour
  • Surface electromyography
  • Sweet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

The influence of taste on swallowing apnea, oral preparation time, and duration and amplitude of submental muscle contraction. / Leow, L. P.; Huckabee, Maggie Lee; Sharma, Shobha; Tooley, T. P.

In: Chemical Senses, Vol. 32, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 119-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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