The Hanikoda Method

3-layered Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Wound Bed Preparation

Ian Chik, Enda G. Kelly, Razman Jarmin, Farrah Hani Imran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction. Negative pressure wound therapy is a widely used method of wound dressing with various commercially available brands. The authors created the Hanikoda Method (HM) for effective wound bed preparation or definite wound closure. Methods. In this case series, the authors discuss 8 different wound cases that presented to their Plastics Unit from January 2014 to June 2015. Patients with traumatic or infected wounds were selected for treatment with the HM. Selected patients underwent multiple cycles of this method until their wounds were ready for definite wound closure or the wounds had closed by secondary closure. Discussion. The purpose of any wound dressing is to encourage epithelization while ensuring no factors impede wound healing. An additional benefit is to reduce wound bed size so that it may close by secondary intention or require less skin graft coverage. Each layer of the dressing is described, along with its function in wound bed preparation or in closure. Conclusion. The HM facilitates reduction of wound size, wound bed preparation, and overall management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)360-368
Number of pages9
JournalWounds
Volume28
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016

Fingerprint

Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy
Wounds and Injuries
Bandages
Hospital Bed Capacity
Wound Healing
Plastics

Keywords

  • Hanikoda Method
  • negative pressure wound therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medical–Surgical

Cite this

The Hanikoda Method : 3-layered Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Wound Bed Preparation. / Chik, Ian; Kelly, Enda G.; Jarmin, Razman; Imran, Farrah Hani.

In: Wounds, Vol. 28, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 360-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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