The GReat-child™ trial

A quasi-experimental intervention on whole grains with healthy balanced diet to manage childhood obesity in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The GReat-Child Trial was a quasi-experimental intervention that has emphasized whole grain as a strategy to manage childhood obesity. Methods: Two schools in Kuala Lumpur with similar demographic characteristics were assigned as intervention (IG) and control (CG). Eligibility criteria were overweight/obese children aged 9 to 11 years who had no serious co-morbidity. Children who reported consuming wholegrain foods in their 3-day diet-recall during screening were excluded. A total of 63 children (31 IG; 32 CG) completed the entire intervention program. The IG children underwent six 30-min nutrition education lessons and had school delivery of wholegrain food on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Parents of IG children attended 1-h individual diet counseling. Anthropometric outcomes including BMI-for-age z-score (BAZ), body fat percentage and waist circumference were measured at baseline [T0], post-intervention [T1] (3rd month) and follow-up [T2] (9th month). Results: IG showed significantly lower BAZ (weighted difference: −0.12; 95% CI: −0.21, −0.03; p = 0.009), body fat percentage (weighted difference: −2.6%; 95% CI: −3.7, −1.5; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (weighted difference: −2.4 cm; 95% CI: −3.8, −1.0; p = 0.001) compared to CG. IG reported significantly lower body fat percentage (weighted difference: −3.4%; 95% CI: 1.8, 5.0; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (weighted difference: −2.1 cm; 95% CI: −3.7, −0.5; p = 0.014) at T1 compared to T0. Conclusions: The GReat-Child Trial made a positive impact in managing childhood obesity. It can be incorporated into childhood obesity intervention programs that are being implemented by the policy makers.

Original languageEnglish
Article number156
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

Fingerprint

childhood obesity
Pediatric Obesity
whole grain foods
Malaysia
waist circumference
diet
Waist Circumference
body fat
Adipose Tissue
Diet
Food
diet counseling
diet recall
sociodemographic characteristics
nutrition education
Whole Grains
Healthy Diet
Administrative Personnel
Counseling
Parents

Keywords

  • Childhood obesity
  • Intervention
  • Malaysia
  • Whole grain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

@article{fdf7bad3249d423eb73bede7172cae9e,
title = "The GReat-child™ trial: A quasi-experimental intervention on whole grains with healthy balanced diet to manage childhood obesity in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia",
abstract = "Background: The GReat-Child Trial was a quasi-experimental intervention that has emphasized whole grain as a strategy to manage childhood obesity. Methods: Two schools in Kuala Lumpur with similar demographic characteristics were assigned as intervention (IG) and control (CG). Eligibility criteria were overweight/obese children aged 9 to 11 years who had no serious co-morbidity. Children who reported consuming wholegrain foods in their 3-day diet-recall during screening were excluded. A total of 63 children (31 IG; 32 CG) completed the entire intervention program. The IG children underwent six 30-min nutrition education lessons and had school delivery of wholegrain food on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Parents of IG children attended 1-h individual diet counseling. Anthropometric outcomes including BMI-for-age z-score (BAZ), body fat percentage and waist circumference were measured at baseline [T0], post-intervention [T1] (3rd month) and follow-up [T2] (9th month). Results: IG showed significantly lower BAZ (weighted difference: −0.12; 95{\%} CI: −0.21, −0.03; p = 0.009), body fat percentage (weighted difference: −2.6{\%}; 95{\%} CI: −3.7, −1.5; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (weighted difference: −2.4 cm; 95{\%} CI: −3.8, −1.0; p = 0.001) compared to CG. IG reported significantly lower body fat percentage (weighted difference: −3.4{\%}; 95{\%} CI: 1.8, 5.0; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (weighted difference: −2.1 cm; 95{\%} CI: −3.7, −0.5; p = 0.014) at T1 compared to T0. Conclusions: The GReat-Child Trial made a positive impact in managing childhood obesity. It can be incorporated into childhood obesity intervention programs that are being implemented by the policy makers.",
keywords = "Childhood obesity, Intervention, Malaysia, Whole grain",
author = "Koo, {Hui Chin} and Poh, {Bee Koon} and {Abd. Talib}, Ruzita",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3390/nu10020156",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Nutrients",
issn = "2072-6643",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
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AU - Poh, Bee Koon

AU - Abd. Talib, Ruzita

PY - 2018/2/1

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N2 - Background: The GReat-Child Trial was a quasi-experimental intervention that has emphasized whole grain as a strategy to manage childhood obesity. Methods: Two schools in Kuala Lumpur with similar demographic characteristics were assigned as intervention (IG) and control (CG). Eligibility criteria were overweight/obese children aged 9 to 11 years who had no serious co-morbidity. Children who reported consuming wholegrain foods in their 3-day diet-recall during screening were excluded. A total of 63 children (31 IG; 32 CG) completed the entire intervention program. The IG children underwent six 30-min nutrition education lessons and had school delivery of wholegrain food on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Parents of IG children attended 1-h individual diet counseling. Anthropometric outcomes including BMI-for-age z-score (BAZ), body fat percentage and waist circumference were measured at baseline [T0], post-intervention [T1] (3rd month) and follow-up [T2] (9th month). Results: IG showed significantly lower BAZ (weighted difference: −0.12; 95% CI: −0.21, −0.03; p = 0.009), body fat percentage (weighted difference: −2.6%; 95% CI: −3.7, −1.5; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (weighted difference: −2.4 cm; 95% CI: −3.8, −1.0; p = 0.001) compared to CG. IG reported significantly lower body fat percentage (weighted difference: −3.4%; 95% CI: 1.8, 5.0; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (weighted difference: −2.1 cm; 95% CI: −3.7, −0.5; p = 0.014) at T1 compared to T0. Conclusions: The GReat-Child Trial made a positive impact in managing childhood obesity. It can be incorporated into childhood obesity intervention programs that are being implemented by the policy makers.

AB - Background: The GReat-Child Trial was a quasi-experimental intervention that has emphasized whole grain as a strategy to manage childhood obesity. Methods: Two schools in Kuala Lumpur with similar demographic characteristics were assigned as intervention (IG) and control (CG). Eligibility criteria were overweight/obese children aged 9 to 11 years who had no serious co-morbidity. Children who reported consuming wholegrain foods in their 3-day diet-recall during screening were excluded. A total of 63 children (31 IG; 32 CG) completed the entire intervention program. The IG children underwent six 30-min nutrition education lessons and had school delivery of wholegrain food on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Parents of IG children attended 1-h individual diet counseling. Anthropometric outcomes including BMI-for-age z-score (BAZ), body fat percentage and waist circumference were measured at baseline [T0], post-intervention [T1] (3rd month) and follow-up [T2] (9th month). Results: IG showed significantly lower BAZ (weighted difference: −0.12; 95% CI: −0.21, −0.03; p = 0.009), body fat percentage (weighted difference: −2.6%; 95% CI: −3.7, −1.5; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (weighted difference: −2.4 cm; 95% CI: −3.8, −1.0; p = 0.001) compared to CG. IG reported significantly lower body fat percentage (weighted difference: −3.4%; 95% CI: 1.8, 5.0; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (weighted difference: −2.1 cm; 95% CI: −3.7, −0.5; p = 0.014) at T1 compared to T0. Conclusions: The GReat-Child Trial made a positive impact in managing childhood obesity. It can be incorporated into childhood obesity intervention programs that are being implemented by the policy makers.

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KW - Intervention

KW - Malaysia

KW - Whole grain

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