The follow-up of post-mastectomy patients

Should the ipsilateral side be assessed with both mammogram and ultrasound?

Radhika Sridharan, Hartini Baherin, Norlia Abdullah, Suria Hayati Md Pauzi, Zulfiqar Mohd Annuar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: This study aimed to determine findings of axillary view mammogram (MMG) and ultrasound (USG) of the ipsilateral side in post-mastectomy patients and to document difficulty level in performing the axillary view and patients’ pain level during the procedure. Methods: Post-mastectomy patients who had MMG and USG on follow-up during an 18-months period were included. The MMG and USG findings of 183 patients were reviewed and histology results were recorded when available. Radiographers’ difficulty and patients’ pain level during the axillary view MMG were charted. Results: On MMG, 172 cases were normal, eight cases were benign (Category 2) and three cases indeterminate (Category 3). On USG, 175 cases were normal, three cases were benign (Category 2) and five cases indeterminate (Category 3). Malignant lesions detected in two out of 183 patients (1%) were metastatic carcinoma in bilateral axillary lymph nodes and leiomyosarcoma at the mastectomy site. These two cases were Category 3 on USG with negative MMG findings. In majority of cases (79%), the radiographer had no difficulty performing the axillary view compared with contralateral MMG. Majority of patients (80%) experienced similar pain during axillary view compared to contralateral MMG. Conclusion: Follow-up imaging of post-mastectomy patients should include (i) USG of the mastectomy site, both axillary regions, and the contralateral breast, and (ii) MMG of the contralateral side. Ipsilateral axillary view MMG is not necessary.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)282-287
Number of pages6
JournalMedical Journal of Malaysia
Volume71
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016

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Mastectomy
Pain
Leiomyosarcoma
Histology
Breast
Lymph Nodes
Carcinoma

Keywords

  • Axillary view
  • Followup
  • Mammogram
  • Post-mastectomy
  • Ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The follow-up of post-mastectomy patients : Should the ipsilateral side be assessed with both mammogram and ultrasound? / Sridharan, Radhika; Baherin, Hartini; Abdullah, Norlia; Md Pauzi, Suria Hayati; Annuar, Zulfiqar Mohd.

In: Medical Journal of Malaysia, Vol. 71, No. 5, 01.10.2016, p. 282-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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