The effects of propane and gasoline sprays structures from automotive fuel injectors under various fuel and ambient pressures on engine performance

Taib Iskandar Mohamad, Mark Jermy, Anni Kaisa Vuorenskoski, Matthew Harrison

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Converting a gasoline engine to propane (LPG) usually results in power reduction. This can be mitigated by careful design of the injection system so the heat required for evaporation of the LPG is drawn from the intake air, so it is cooled and densified, resulting in an increase in volumetric efficiency. In this work, LPG sprays were imaged using Mie and LIF imaging techniques from a gasoline direct injection (GDI) injector, a port fuel injector and from long and short pipes connecting a remote LPG metering valve to the injection point. Images were taken in an optically accessed pressure chamber at pressures from atmospheric to 20 bar and with fuel line pressures from 10 to 80 bar. The imaging of the pipe-coupled injection system shows that there is significant evaporation in the pipe, which amount depends on the length and diameter of the pipe. During its travel down the pipe, the injected pulse of fuel spreads out so the duration of the LPG pulse at the manifold end is, for 300mm pipes, five times the original duration at the injector and even greater for 600mm pipes. The narrow structure of the sprays and the amount of evaporation that occurs before the fuel enters the manifold explains the observed differences in engine torque and in-cylinder mixture temperature observed with the different systems. The spray structures with gasoline and LPG from the direct injector are similar and more sensitive to changes in fuel or chamber pressure than to the type of fuel.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)396-403
    Number of pages8
    JournalWorld Applied Sciences Journal
    Volume18
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Fingerprint

    Automotive fuels
    Propane
    Liquefied petroleum gas
    Gasoline
    Pipe
    Engines
    Evaporation
    Imaging techniques
    Air intakes
    Direct injection
    Engine cylinders
    Torque

    Keywords

    • Direct Injection
    • Engine Torque
    • Gasoline
    • Mie
    • PLIF
    • Port Injection
    • Propane

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • General

    Cite this

    The effects of propane and gasoline sprays structures from automotive fuel injectors under various fuel and ambient pressures on engine performance. / Mohamad, Taib Iskandar; Jermy, Mark; Vuorenskoski, Anni Kaisa; Harrison, Matthew.

    In: World Applied Sciences Journal, Vol. 18, No. 3, 2012, p. 396-403.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Mohamad, Taib Iskandar ; Jermy, Mark ; Vuorenskoski, Anni Kaisa ; Harrison, Matthew. / The effects of propane and gasoline sprays structures from automotive fuel injectors under various fuel and ambient pressures on engine performance. In: World Applied Sciences Journal. 2012 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 396-403.
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