The effects of heated vegetable oils on blood pressure in rats

Kamsiah Jaarin, Mohd Rais Mustafa, Xin Fang Leong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to determine the possible mechanism that is involved in the blood pressureraising effect of heated vegetable oils. METHODS: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 11 groups; the control group was fed with rat chow, and the other groups were fed with chow that was mixed with 15% weight/weight palm or soy oils, which were either in a fresh form or heated once, twice, five, or ten times. Blood pressures were measured at the baseline and throughout the 24-week study. Plasma nitric oxide levels were assessed prior to treatment and at the end of the study. Following 24 weeks, the rats were sacrificed to investigate their vascular reactivity using the thoracic aorta. RESULTS: Palm and soy oils had no detrimental effects on blood pressure, and they significantly elevated the nitric oxide contents and reduced the contractile responses to phenylephrine. However, trials using palm and soy oils that were repeatedly heated showed an increase in blood pressure, enhanced phenylephrine-induced contractions, reduced acetylcholine-and sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations relative to the control and rats that were fed fresh vegetable oils. CONCLUSIONS: The blood pressure-raising effect of the heated vegetable cooking oils is associated with increased vascular reactivity and a reduction in nitric oxide levels. The chronic consumption of heated vegetable oils leads to disturbances in endogenous vascular regulatory substances, such as nitric oxide. The thermal oxidation of the cooking oils promotes the generation of free radicals and may play an important contributory role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in rats.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2125-2132
Number of pages8
JournalClinics
Volume66
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Plant Oils
Nitric Oxide
Blood Pressure
Blood Vessels
Cooking
Phenylephrine
Oils
Weights and Measures
Nitroprusside
Thoracic Aorta
Acetylcholine
Free Radicals
Sprague Dawley Rats
Hot Temperature
Hypertension
Control Groups
palm oil

Keywords

  • Aorta
  • Blood pressure
  • Heating
  • Palm oil
  • Soy oil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The effects of heated vegetable oils on blood pressure in rats. / Jaarin, Kamsiah; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Leong, Xin Fang.

In: Clinics, Vol. 66, No. 12, 2011, p. 2125-2132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jaarin, Kamsiah ; Mustafa, Mohd Rais ; Leong, Xin Fang. / The effects of heated vegetable oils on blood pressure in rats. In: Clinics. 2011 ; Vol. 66, No. 12. pp. 2125-2132.
@article{45b1d53b7342492bab2462e224bd3ea5,
title = "The effects of heated vegetable oils on blood pressure in rats",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to determine the possible mechanism that is involved in the blood pressureraising effect of heated vegetable oils. METHODS: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 11 groups; the control group was fed with rat chow, and the other groups were fed with chow that was mixed with 15{\%} weight/weight palm or soy oils, which were either in a fresh form or heated once, twice, five, or ten times. Blood pressures were measured at the baseline and throughout the 24-week study. Plasma nitric oxide levels were assessed prior to treatment and at the end of the study. Following 24 weeks, the rats were sacrificed to investigate their vascular reactivity using the thoracic aorta. RESULTS: Palm and soy oils had no detrimental effects on blood pressure, and they significantly elevated the nitric oxide contents and reduced the contractile responses to phenylephrine. However, trials using palm and soy oils that were repeatedly heated showed an increase in blood pressure, enhanced phenylephrine-induced contractions, reduced acetylcholine-and sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations relative to the control and rats that were fed fresh vegetable oils. CONCLUSIONS: The blood pressure-raising effect of the heated vegetable cooking oils is associated with increased vascular reactivity and a reduction in nitric oxide levels. The chronic consumption of heated vegetable oils leads to disturbances in endogenous vascular regulatory substances, such as nitric oxide. The thermal oxidation of the cooking oils promotes the generation of free radicals and may play an important contributory role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in rats.",
keywords = "Aorta, Blood pressure, Heating, Palm oil, Soy oil",
author = "Kamsiah Jaarin and Mustafa, {Mohd Rais} and Leong, {Xin Fang}",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1590/S1807-59322011001200020",
language = "English",
volume = "66",
pages = "2125--2132",
journal = "Clinics",
issn = "1807-5932",
publisher = "University of Sao Paolo",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of heated vegetable oils on blood pressure in rats

AU - Jaarin, Kamsiah

AU - Mustafa, Mohd Rais

AU - Leong, Xin Fang

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to determine the possible mechanism that is involved in the blood pressureraising effect of heated vegetable oils. METHODS: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 11 groups; the control group was fed with rat chow, and the other groups were fed with chow that was mixed with 15% weight/weight palm or soy oils, which were either in a fresh form or heated once, twice, five, or ten times. Blood pressures were measured at the baseline and throughout the 24-week study. Plasma nitric oxide levels were assessed prior to treatment and at the end of the study. Following 24 weeks, the rats were sacrificed to investigate their vascular reactivity using the thoracic aorta. RESULTS: Palm and soy oils had no detrimental effects on blood pressure, and they significantly elevated the nitric oxide contents and reduced the contractile responses to phenylephrine. However, trials using palm and soy oils that were repeatedly heated showed an increase in blood pressure, enhanced phenylephrine-induced contractions, reduced acetylcholine-and sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations relative to the control and rats that were fed fresh vegetable oils. CONCLUSIONS: The blood pressure-raising effect of the heated vegetable cooking oils is associated with increased vascular reactivity and a reduction in nitric oxide levels. The chronic consumption of heated vegetable oils leads to disturbances in endogenous vascular regulatory substances, such as nitric oxide. The thermal oxidation of the cooking oils promotes the generation of free radicals and may play an important contributory role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in rats.

AB - OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to determine the possible mechanism that is involved in the blood pressureraising effect of heated vegetable oils. METHODS: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 11 groups; the control group was fed with rat chow, and the other groups were fed with chow that was mixed with 15% weight/weight palm or soy oils, which were either in a fresh form or heated once, twice, five, or ten times. Blood pressures were measured at the baseline and throughout the 24-week study. Plasma nitric oxide levels were assessed prior to treatment and at the end of the study. Following 24 weeks, the rats were sacrificed to investigate their vascular reactivity using the thoracic aorta. RESULTS: Palm and soy oils had no detrimental effects on blood pressure, and they significantly elevated the nitric oxide contents and reduced the contractile responses to phenylephrine. However, trials using palm and soy oils that were repeatedly heated showed an increase in blood pressure, enhanced phenylephrine-induced contractions, reduced acetylcholine-and sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations relative to the control and rats that were fed fresh vegetable oils. CONCLUSIONS: The blood pressure-raising effect of the heated vegetable cooking oils is associated with increased vascular reactivity and a reduction in nitric oxide levels. The chronic consumption of heated vegetable oils leads to disturbances in endogenous vascular regulatory substances, such as nitric oxide. The thermal oxidation of the cooking oils promotes the generation of free radicals and may play an important contributory role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in rats.

KW - Aorta

KW - Blood pressure

KW - Heating

KW - Palm oil

KW - Soy oil

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84455208858&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84455208858&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1590/S1807-59322011001200020

DO - 10.1590/S1807-59322011001200020

M3 - Article

VL - 66

SP - 2125

EP - 2132

JO - Clinics

JF - Clinics

SN - 1807-5932

IS - 12

ER -