The effects of cooking on oxalate content in Malaysian soy-based dishes: Comparisons with raw soy products

Ghazaleh Shimi, Hasnah Haron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The advantage of cooking cannot be summarized just as the better food digestion. Some investigations showed the effect of cooking on reduction of food anti-nutrients such as oxalate. This study was aimed to determine the effect of cooking on oxalate content and its negative effects on calcium availability in eight Malaysian soy-based dishes. Since there is few data which examined the effects of cooking on food oxalate content globally, thus this study was designed as the first in Malaysia. Oxalate in this research was analyzed by using enzymatic methods, while calcium content was determined by using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The oxalate concentration was in the range of 6.43-19.40 mg/100 g for whole cooked samples, 9.03-11.90 mg/100 g for raw soy products, and 4.36-7.99 mg/100 g for cooked ones. There were 5 out of 12 samples containing oxalate, which was significantly lower (p < 0.05) in cooked products compared to the raw ones. The rest of the samples were also lower in oxalate but not significantly different (p > 0.05). Oxalate in raw/cooked fermented soy products (tempeh) was slightly lower compared to the non-fermented ones. However, there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in oxalate amount between fermented and non-fermented soy products. As Oxalate/Calcium ratio was below 1, oxalate did not have an effect on availability of calcium in the studied samples. Optimal cooking and food processing might be effective in reducing oxalate content in soy products. There is a need for more investigations about the effect of cooking on soy products to confirm the present results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2109-2024
Number of pages86
JournalInternational Food Research Journal
Volume21
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

soybean products
Oxalates
Cooking
oxalates
cooking
Food
Calcium
calcium
tempeh
Soy Foods
sampling
Calcium Oxalate
calcium oxalate
Food Handling
Malaysia
spectrophotometers
food processing
Digestion
digestion

Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Cooking
  • Malaysian
  • Oxalate
  • Soy products

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

The effects of cooking on oxalate content in Malaysian soy-based dishes : Comparisons with raw soy products. / Shimi, Ghazaleh; Haron, Hasnah.

In: International Food Research Journal, Vol. 21, No. 5, 2014, p. 2109-2024.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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