The effects of annatto tocotrienol supplementation on cartilage and subchondral bone in an animal model of osteoarthritis induced by monosodium iodoacetate

Chin Kok Yong, Sok Kuan Wong, Fadhlullah Zuhair Japar Sidik, Juliana Abdul Hamid, Nurul Hafizah Abas, Elvy Suhana Mohd Ramli, Sabarul Afian Mokhtar, Sakthiswary Rajalingham, Ima Nirwana Soelaiman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease which primarily affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bones. Since there is an underlying localized inflammatory component in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, compounds like tocotrienol with anti-inflammatory properties may be able to retard its progression. This study aimed to determine the effects of oral tocotrienol supplementation on the articular cartilage and subchondral bone in a rat model of osteoarthritis induced by monosodium iodoacetate (MIA). Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats (three-month-old) were randomized into five groups. Four groups were induced with osteoarthritis (single injection of MIA at week 0) and another served as the sham group. Three of the four groups with osteoarthritis were supplemented with annatto tocotrienol at 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg/day orally for five weeks. At week 5, all rats were sacrificed, and their tibial-femoral joints were harvested for analysis. The results indicated that the groups which received annatto tocotrienol at 100 and 150 mg/kg/day had lower histological scores and cartilage remodeling markers. Annatto tocotrienol at 150 mg/kg/day significantly lowered the osteocalcin levels and osteoclast surface of subchondral bone. In conclusion, annatto tocotrienol may potentially retard the progression of osteoarthritis. Future studies to confirm its mechanism of joint protection should be performed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2897
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume16
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Aug 2019

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Tocotrienols
Iodoacetates
Osteoarthritis
Cartilage
Animal Models
Bone and Bones
Articular Cartilage
Joints
Osteocalcin
Osteoclasts
Thigh
annatto
Sprague Dawley Rats
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Injections

Keywords

  • Antioxidant
  • Arthritis
  • Inflammation
  • Joint
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

The effects of annatto tocotrienol supplementation on cartilage and subchondral bone in an animal model of osteoarthritis induced by monosodium iodoacetate. / Kok Yong, Chin; Wong, Sok Kuan; Sidik, Fadhlullah Zuhair Japar; Hamid, Juliana Abdul; Abas, Nurul Hafizah; Mohd Ramli, Elvy Suhana; Mokhtar, Sabarul Afian; Rajalingham, Sakthiswary; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana.

In: International journal of environmental research and public health, Vol. 16, No. 16, 2897, 02.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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