The effect of supplementary food upon the activity patterns of wood mice, Apodemus sylvaticus, living on a system of maritime sand-dunes

Zubaid Akbar Mukhtar Ahmad, Martyn L. Gorman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The wood mouse is primarily a woodland species but it also occurs on maritime sand-dunes. The mice living on the sand-dunes leave their nests earlier in the evening and spend more time out of the nest than those animals living in woodlands. Here we test the hypothesis that this difference is because woodland provides substantially more food than do sand-dunes. Our experimental approach was to provide supplementary food in the form of wheatgrain to a sand-dune population and compare activity patterns with a control population. The mice on the supplemented area were strictly nocturnal and spent less time above ground than the controls. Their activity pattern was essentially the same as that of wood mice living in deciduous woodland.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)759-768
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Zoology
Volume238
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1996

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Apodemus sylvaticus
Apodemus
activity pattern
dunes
dune
woodlands
woodland
food
nest
nests
mice
effect
animal
animals
testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

The effect of supplementary food upon the activity patterns of wood mice, Apodemus sylvaticus, living on a system of maritime sand-dunes. / Mukhtar Ahmad, Zubaid Akbar; Gorman, Martyn L.

In: Journal of Zoology, Vol. 238, No. 4, 1996, p. 759-768.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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