The effect of menus and signposting on the speed and accuracy of sense selection

Hilary Nesi, Kim Hua Tan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A number of dictionaries include numbered 'signposts' in polysemous dictionary entries. These may be placed in a 'menu' at the top of the entry, or distributed as 'shortcuts' before each meaning. This study compares the effect of three versions of entries for MED2 'red' words (i.e. those of particular usefulness to learners): with their original menus, without menus, and with the menu information dispersed within the entry. Participants selected appropriate meanings from a paper-based mini-dictionary, and a purpose-built quiz type program recorded their answers and the time taken to select each meaning. A total of 2109 consultations were recorded. Selection time with and without signposting did not differ significantly, but responses to entries containing shortcuts were significantly more accurate than responses to entries with no signposting. Surprisingly, the last sense in the entry proved easiest to identify. A positive correlation between proficiency score and test score was noted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-96
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Lexicography
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

Dictionary
Proficiency
Test Scores
Usefulness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

The effect of menus and signposting on the speed and accuracy of sense selection. / Nesi, Hilary; Tan, Kim Hua.

In: International Journal of Lexicography, Vol. 24, No. 1, 03.2011, p. 79-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{44f88fa6c26541f68a6b49fbb6d2ea2b,
title = "The effect of menus and signposting on the speed and accuracy of sense selection",
abstract = "A number of dictionaries include numbered 'signposts' in polysemous dictionary entries. These may be placed in a 'menu' at the top of the entry, or distributed as 'shortcuts' before each meaning. This study compares the effect of three versions of entries for MED2 'red' words (i.e. those of particular usefulness to learners): with their original menus, without menus, and with the menu information dispersed within the entry. Participants selected appropriate meanings from a paper-based mini-dictionary, and a purpose-built quiz type program recorded their answers and the time taken to select each meaning. A total of 2109 consultations were recorded. Selection time with and without signposting did not differ significantly, but responses to entries containing shortcuts were significantly more accurate than responses to entries with no signposting. Surprisingly, the last sense in the entry proved easiest to identify. A positive correlation between proficiency score and test score was noted.",
author = "Hilary Nesi and Tan, {Kim Hua}",
year = "2011",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1093/ijl/ecq040",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "79--96",
journal = "International Journal of Lexicography",
issn = "0950-3846",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of menus and signposting on the speed and accuracy of sense selection

AU - Nesi, Hilary

AU - Tan, Kim Hua

PY - 2011/3

Y1 - 2011/3

N2 - A number of dictionaries include numbered 'signposts' in polysemous dictionary entries. These may be placed in a 'menu' at the top of the entry, or distributed as 'shortcuts' before each meaning. This study compares the effect of three versions of entries for MED2 'red' words (i.e. those of particular usefulness to learners): with their original menus, without menus, and with the menu information dispersed within the entry. Participants selected appropriate meanings from a paper-based mini-dictionary, and a purpose-built quiz type program recorded their answers and the time taken to select each meaning. A total of 2109 consultations were recorded. Selection time with and without signposting did not differ significantly, but responses to entries containing shortcuts were significantly more accurate than responses to entries with no signposting. Surprisingly, the last sense in the entry proved easiest to identify. A positive correlation between proficiency score and test score was noted.

AB - A number of dictionaries include numbered 'signposts' in polysemous dictionary entries. These may be placed in a 'menu' at the top of the entry, or distributed as 'shortcuts' before each meaning. This study compares the effect of three versions of entries for MED2 'red' words (i.e. those of particular usefulness to learners): with their original menus, without menus, and with the menu information dispersed within the entry. Participants selected appropriate meanings from a paper-based mini-dictionary, and a purpose-built quiz type program recorded their answers and the time taken to select each meaning. A total of 2109 consultations were recorded. Selection time with and without signposting did not differ significantly, but responses to entries containing shortcuts were significantly more accurate than responses to entries with no signposting. Surprisingly, the last sense in the entry proved easiest to identify. A positive correlation between proficiency score and test score was noted.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79952164865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79952164865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/ijl/ecq040

DO - 10.1093/ijl/ecq040

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 79

EP - 96

JO - International Journal of Lexicography

JF - International Journal of Lexicography

SN - 0950-3846

IS - 1

ER -