The dismissal of a pregnant stewardess

Still lawful in Malaysia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although Malaysian laws generally do not explicitly discriminate against women in employment, such discrimination does occur. The Federal Constitution, being the supreme law of Malaysia, provides a guarantee of equality in employment. However, Article 8, which prohibits gender discrimination in employment, refers to public services. In the case described here a stewardess worked for a private airline and the courts determined that constitutional protection did not extend to her. It would appear that the Malaysian court's strict interpretation of Article 8 renders valid the term of a collective employment agreement requiring a stewardess to resign if she becomes pregnant. This paper examines the interplay between an employment contract, a collective agreement, employment law and the constitutional rights of Malaysian citizens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-132
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Gender Studies
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Malaysia
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citizen
interpretation
gender

Keywords

  • Collective agreement
  • Employment contract
  • Federal Constitution
  • Gender
  • Malaysian law

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Gender Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The dismissal of a pregnant stewardess : Still lawful in Malaysia. / Hassan, Kamal Halili.

In: Journal of Gender Studies, Vol. 21, No. 2, 2012, p. 125-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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